AMPA/kainate receptors mediate axonal morphological disruption in hypoxic white matter

Selva Baltan Tekkök, Brian T. Faddis, Mark P. Goldberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

We used acute brain slices to investigate the hypothesis that oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) induced loss of axon function and neurofilament labeling are correlated to axonal morphological disruption in the corpus callosum of adult brain. Coronal brain slices including corpus callosum were prepared from adult mice. White matter immunohistochemical properties and conduction along axons remained stable over 12 h after preparation. White matter injury was assessed by recording compound action potentials (CAPs) across corpus callosum, combined with immunofluorescence for axonal neurofilaments and by bright field microscopy of myelin profiles in semi-thin sections. OGD for 30 min resulted in irreversible loss of the CAPs, formation of axon heads and bulbs, and swelling of myelin profiles in slices examined 1 h after OGD. In slices followed for 9 h after OGD, there was complete loss of neurofilament labeling and myelin profiles. Because overactivation of AMPA/kainate receptors mediates axon structural and functional disruption in hypoxic corpus callosum slices, we tested whether blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors reduced OGD-induced axonal morphological disruption. NBQX (30 μM), an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist, prevented OGD-induced formation of axon heads and bulbs, swelling of myelin profiles, loss of neurofilament staining and preserved axonal morphology. These results expand our previous findings that the AMPA/kainate receptor activation contributes to axonal morphological disruption, as well as loss of electrical function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-279
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume382
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 15 2005

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Keywords

  • Corpus callosum
  • Excitotoxicity
  • Myelin
  • White matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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