Anti-cancer strategy of transitional cell carcinoma of bladder based on induction of different types of programmed cell deaths

Jose A. Karam, Jer Tsong Hsieh

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Current treatment for advanced malignancy of the bladder cancer relies on combination chemotherapeutic agent regimens. In these patients chemotherapeutic resistance emerges in the form of an aggressive subpopulation of tumor cells even if there has been a good initial response. The majority of chemotherapeutic agents target mitotic cancer cells by inducing DNA damage pathways or altering cell cycle regulation. Drug resistance often arises from the remaining post-mitotic cancer cells, which can be further targeted by triggering the intrinsic apoptotic, autophagic, or necrotic pathways. If the death pathway could be activated extrinsically, there would be the potential for a synergistic toxic effect on tumor cells. In addition, if the death pathway was identified as being nonfunctional for any of the reasons outlined, the restoration of function could reactivate the immune system anti-tumor response. Current strategy is to decipher the complexities of death pathways in order to identify key effector molecules and their function. As their mechanisms have been elucidated, so has the knowledge that aberrations can occur at many points along the pathway, interfering with normal function. This has fueled exciting new research attempts to engineer novel therapeutic options.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationApoptosis in Carcinogenesis and Chemotherapy
Subtitle of host publicationApoptosis in Cancer
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
Pages25-50
Number of pages26
ISBN (Electronic)9781402095979
ISBN (Print)9781402095962
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • Autophagy
  • Bladder Cancer
  • Necrosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    Karam, J. A., & Hsieh, J. T. (2009). Anti-cancer strategy of transitional cell carcinoma of bladder based on induction of different types of programmed cell deaths. In Apoptosis in Carcinogenesis and Chemotherapy: Apoptosis in Cancer (pp. 25-50). Springer Netherlands. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-9597-9-2