Assessment of operating room airflow using air particle counts and direct observation of door openings

Jonathan Teter, Isabella Guajardo, Tamrah Al-Rammah, Gedge Rosson, Trish M. Perl, Michele Manahan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The role of the operating room (OR) environment has been thought to contribute to surgical site infection rates. The quality of OR air, disruption of airflow, and other factors may increase contamination risks. We measured air particulate counts (APCs) to determine if they increased in relation to traffic, door opening, and other common activities. Methods During 1 week, we recorded APCs in 5-minute intervals and movement of health care workers. Trained observers recorded information about traffic, door openings, job title of the opener, and the reason for opening. Results At least 1 OR door was open during 47% of all readings. There were 13.4 door openings per hour during cases. Door opening rates ranged from 0.19-0.28 per minute. During this time, a total of 660 air measurements were obtained. The mean APCs were 9,238 particles (95% confidence interval [CI], 5,494- 12,982) at baseline and 14,292 particles (95% CI, 12,382-16,201) during surgery. Overall APCs increased 13% when either door was opened (P < .15). Larger particles that correlated to bacterial size were elevated significantly (P < .001) on door opening. Conclusions We observed numerous instances of verbal communication and equipment movement. Improving efficiency of communication and equipment can aid in reduction of traffic. Further study is needed to examine links between microbiologic sampling, outcome data, and particulate matter to enable study of risk factors and effects of personnel movement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)477-482
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Fingerprint

Operating Rooms
Air
Observation
Confidence Intervals
Surgical Wound Infection
Equipment and Supplies
Particulate Matter
Reading
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Air quality
  • Infection control
  • Operating room
  • Particulate matter
  • Surgery
  • Surgical site infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Assessment of operating room airflow using air particle counts and direct observation of door openings. / Teter, Jonathan; Guajardo, Isabella; Al-Rammah, Tamrah; Rosson, Gedge; Perl, Trish M.; Manahan, Michele.

In: American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 45, No. 5, 01.05.2017, p. 477-482.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Teter, Jonathan ; Guajardo, Isabella ; Al-Rammah, Tamrah ; Rosson, Gedge ; Perl, Trish M. ; Manahan, Michele. / Assessment of operating room airflow using air particle counts and direct observation of door openings. In: American Journal of Infection Control. 2017 ; Vol. 45, No. 5. pp. 477-482.
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