Association of postprandial hypotension with incidence of falls, syncope, coronary events, stroke, and total mortality at 29-month follow-up in 499 older nursing home residents

Wilbert S. Aronow, Chul Ahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

118 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether a marked decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure correlates with a higher incidence of falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality at long-term follow-up in older nursing home residents. DESIGN: In a prospective study of 499 nursing home residents aged 62 years or older, at 29-month mean follow-up, the maximal reduction in postprandial systolic blood pressure was correlated with the incidence of falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality. SETTING: A large long-term health care facility. PATIENTS: The 499 ambulatory or wheelchair-bound residents included 354 women and 145 men, mean age 80 ± 9 years (range 62-100). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 29 ± 10 months (range 1-36). At follow-up, falls had occurred in 199 persons (40%), syncope in 72 persons (14%), new coronary events in 139 persons (28%), new stroke in 61 persons (12%), and total mortality in 199 persons (40%). The mean maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure was 20 ± 5 mm Hg for persons With falls find 12 ± 4 mm Hg in persons without falls (P < 0.001); 23 ± 5 mm Hg in persons with syncope and 14 ± 5 mm Hg in persons without syncope (P < 0.001); 18 ± 6 mm Hg in persons with coronary events and 14 ± 5 mm Hg in persons without coronary events (P < 0.001); 21 ± 6 mm Hg in persons with stroke and 15 ± 5 mm Hg in persons without stroke (P < 0.001); and 17 ± 6 mm Hg in persons who died and 15 ± 5 mm Hg in persons who did not die (P < 0.001). Maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure was an independent risk factor for falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality. Age was an independent risk factor for new coronary events and for total mortality. Male sex was an independent risk factor for syncope, new coronary events, stroke, and total mortality. Prior falls was an independent risk factor for new falls. Prior syncope was an independent risk factor for new syncope. Prior stroke was an independent risk factor for new stroke. CONCLUSIONS: A marked reduction in postprandial systolic blood pressure in older nursing home residents was associated at long-term follow-up with a higher incidence of falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1051-1053
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume45
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1997

Fingerprint

Syncope
Nursing Homes
Hypotension
Stroke
Mortality
Incidence
Blood Pressure
Homes for the Aged
Wheelchairs
Health Facilities
Long-Term Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

@article{f8f3006768f447b1a76ba9aeb56786a6,
title = "Association of postprandial hypotension with incidence of falls, syncope, coronary events, stroke, and total mortality at 29-month follow-up in 499 older nursing home residents",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether a marked decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure correlates with a higher incidence of falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality at long-term follow-up in older nursing home residents. DESIGN: In a prospective study of 499 nursing home residents aged 62 years or older, at 29-month mean follow-up, the maximal reduction in postprandial systolic blood pressure was correlated with the incidence of falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality. SETTING: A large long-term health care facility. PATIENTS: The 499 ambulatory or wheelchair-bound residents included 354 women and 145 men, mean age 80 ± 9 years (range 62-100). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 29 ± 10 months (range 1-36). At follow-up, falls had occurred in 199 persons (40{\%}), syncope in 72 persons (14{\%}), new coronary events in 139 persons (28{\%}), new stroke in 61 persons (12{\%}), and total mortality in 199 persons (40{\%}). The mean maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure was 20 ± 5 mm Hg for persons With falls find 12 ± 4 mm Hg in persons without falls (P < 0.001); 23 ± 5 mm Hg in persons with syncope and 14 ± 5 mm Hg in persons without syncope (P < 0.001); 18 ± 6 mm Hg in persons with coronary events and 14 ± 5 mm Hg in persons without coronary events (P < 0.001); 21 ± 6 mm Hg in persons with stroke and 15 ± 5 mm Hg in persons without stroke (P < 0.001); and 17 ± 6 mm Hg in persons who died and 15 ± 5 mm Hg in persons who did not die (P < 0.001). Maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure was an independent risk factor for falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality. Age was an independent risk factor for new coronary events and for total mortality. Male sex was an independent risk factor for syncope, new coronary events, stroke, and total mortality. Prior falls was an independent risk factor for new falls. Prior syncope was an independent risk factor for new syncope. Prior stroke was an independent risk factor for new stroke. CONCLUSIONS: A marked reduction in postprandial systolic blood pressure in older nursing home residents was associated at long-term follow-up with a higher incidence of falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality.",
author = "Aronow, {Wilbert S.} and Chul Ahn",
year = "1997",
month = "9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "45",
pages = "1051--1053",
journal = "Journal of the American Geriatrics Society",
issn = "0002-8614",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of postprandial hypotension with incidence of falls, syncope, coronary events, stroke, and total mortality at 29-month follow-up in 499 older nursing home residents

AU - Aronow, Wilbert S.

AU - Ahn, Chul

PY - 1997/9

Y1 - 1997/9

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether a marked decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure correlates with a higher incidence of falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality at long-term follow-up in older nursing home residents. DESIGN: In a prospective study of 499 nursing home residents aged 62 years or older, at 29-month mean follow-up, the maximal reduction in postprandial systolic blood pressure was correlated with the incidence of falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality. SETTING: A large long-term health care facility. PATIENTS: The 499 ambulatory or wheelchair-bound residents included 354 women and 145 men, mean age 80 ± 9 years (range 62-100). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 29 ± 10 months (range 1-36). At follow-up, falls had occurred in 199 persons (40%), syncope in 72 persons (14%), new coronary events in 139 persons (28%), new stroke in 61 persons (12%), and total mortality in 199 persons (40%). The mean maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure was 20 ± 5 mm Hg for persons With falls find 12 ± 4 mm Hg in persons without falls (P < 0.001); 23 ± 5 mm Hg in persons with syncope and 14 ± 5 mm Hg in persons without syncope (P < 0.001); 18 ± 6 mm Hg in persons with coronary events and 14 ± 5 mm Hg in persons without coronary events (P < 0.001); 21 ± 6 mm Hg in persons with stroke and 15 ± 5 mm Hg in persons without stroke (P < 0.001); and 17 ± 6 mm Hg in persons who died and 15 ± 5 mm Hg in persons who did not die (P < 0.001). Maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure was an independent risk factor for falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality. Age was an independent risk factor for new coronary events and for total mortality. Male sex was an independent risk factor for syncope, new coronary events, stroke, and total mortality. Prior falls was an independent risk factor for new falls. Prior syncope was an independent risk factor for new syncope. Prior stroke was an independent risk factor for new stroke. CONCLUSIONS: A marked reduction in postprandial systolic blood pressure in older nursing home residents was associated at long-term follow-up with a higher incidence of falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether a marked decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure correlates with a higher incidence of falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality at long-term follow-up in older nursing home residents. DESIGN: In a prospective study of 499 nursing home residents aged 62 years or older, at 29-month mean follow-up, the maximal reduction in postprandial systolic blood pressure was correlated with the incidence of falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality. SETTING: A large long-term health care facility. PATIENTS: The 499 ambulatory or wheelchair-bound residents included 354 women and 145 men, mean age 80 ± 9 years (range 62-100). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 29 ± 10 months (range 1-36). At follow-up, falls had occurred in 199 persons (40%), syncope in 72 persons (14%), new coronary events in 139 persons (28%), new stroke in 61 persons (12%), and total mortality in 199 persons (40%). The mean maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure was 20 ± 5 mm Hg for persons With falls find 12 ± 4 mm Hg in persons without falls (P < 0.001); 23 ± 5 mm Hg in persons with syncope and 14 ± 5 mm Hg in persons without syncope (P < 0.001); 18 ± 6 mm Hg in persons with coronary events and 14 ± 5 mm Hg in persons without coronary events (P < 0.001); 21 ± 6 mm Hg in persons with stroke and 15 ± 5 mm Hg in persons without stroke (P < 0.001); and 17 ± 6 mm Hg in persons who died and 15 ± 5 mm Hg in persons who did not die (P < 0.001). Maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure was an independent risk factor for falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality. Age was an independent risk factor for new coronary events and for total mortality. Male sex was an independent risk factor for syncope, new coronary events, stroke, and total mortality. Prior falls was an independent risk factor for new falls. Prior syncope was an independent risk factor for new syncope. Prior stroke was an independent risk factor for new stroke. CONCLUSIONS: A marked reduction in postprandial systolic blood pressure in older nursing home residents was associated at long-term follow-up with a higher incidence of falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030751357&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030751357&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 45

SP - 1051

EP - 1053

JO - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

SN - 0002-8614

IS - 9

ER -