Autonomic responses to exercise: Where is central command?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A central command is thought to involve a signal arising in a central area of the brain eliciting a parallel activation of the autonomic nervous system and skeletal muscle contraction during exercise. Although much of the neural circuitry involved in autonomic control has been identified, defining the specific higher brain region(s) serving in a central command capacity has proven more challenging. Investigators have been faced with redundancies in regulatory systems, feedback mechanisms and the complexities ofhuman neural connectivity. Several studies have attempted to address these issues and provide more definitive neuroanatomical information. However, none have clearly answered the question, "where is central command?".

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-4
Number of pages2
JournalAutonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical
Volume188
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

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Autonomic Nervous System
Brain
Muscle Contraction
Skeletal Muscle
Research Personnel

Keywords

  • Central command
  • Exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems

Cite this

Autonomic responses to exercise : Where is central command? / Williamson, J. W.

In: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical, Vol. 188, 01.03.2015, p. 3-4.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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