Biological Basis of Healing and Repair in Remission and Relapse

Raymond J. Playford, Daniel K. Podolsky

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Inflammation and repair are interrelated processes mediated by common cytokines and growth factors. Mesenchymal-epithelial interactions and cross-talk are probably important in maintaining intestinal integrity and repair. Repair processes may involve exposure of previously inaccessible growth factor receptors or redistribution of receptorswithin surviving cells. A large number of growth factors have shown promise using in vitro and in vivo animal studies. However, the majorityhave failed to translate into benefit when tested in clinical trials. Despite the failure of many of the early clinical trials, our greater understanding of the fundamental processesunderlying the inflammatory and repair pathways is likely to be translated into novel therapies within the next few years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInflammatory Bowel Disease: Translating basic science into clinical practice
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Pages170-181
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)9781405157254
DOIs
StatePublished - May 18 2010

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Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Clinical Trials
Recurrence
Growth Factor Receptors
Cytokines
Inflammation
Therapeutics
In Vitro Techniques

Keywords

  • Biological basis of healing and repair in remission and relapse
  • Cytokines - component of normal defense process
  • Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor ligand family
  • Factors regulating mucosal repair and protecting from injury in intestine
  • Gastrointestinal stem cells - stem cell "niche"
  • Regulation of mucosal repair - subepithelial cell populations and stroma
  • Vascular endothelial growth factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Playford, R. J., & Podolsky, D. K. (2010). Biological Basis of Healing and Repair in Remission and Relapse. In Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Translating basic science into clinical practice (pp. 170-181). Wiley-Blackwell. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781444318418.ch12

Biological Basis of Healing and Repair in Remission and Relapse. / Playford, Raymond J.; Podolsky, Daniel K.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Translating basic science into clinical practice. Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. p. 170-181.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Playford, RJ & Podolsky, DK 2010, Biological Basis of Healing and Repair in Remission and Relapse. in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Translating basic science into clinical practice. Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 170-181. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781444318418.ch12
Playford RJ, Podolsky DK. Biological Basis of Healing and Repair in Remission and Relapse. In Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Translating basic science into clinical practice. Wiley-Blackwell. 2010. p. 170-181 https://doi.org/10.1002/9781444318418.ch12
Playford, Raymond J. ; Podolsky, Daniel K. / Biological Basis of Healing and Repair in Remission and Relapse. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Translating basic science into clinical practice. Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. pp. 170-181
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