Blind and confused

Vibhash D. Sharma, Patrick Malafronte, Nicole De Simone, Benjamin M. Greenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A 62-year-old man developed confusion and was diagnosed as having encephalitis. The etiology was not identified. He continued to have cognitive impairment but remained clinically stable. Five months later, he woke with bilateral vision loss. On neurological examination, he had no light perception bilaterally. The remainder of the neurological examination results were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed multiple brain lesions. He was treated with steroids and plasmapheresis, with mild improvement in vision. He was then transferred to a long-term care facility, where he developed increasing confusion and ultimately died. An autopsy was performed; the differential diagnosis, neuropathology, and final diagnosis are discussed here.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)932-936
Number of pages5
JournalJAMA Neurology
Volume70
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

Fingerprint

Confusion
Neurologic Examination
Plasmapheresis
Brain
Long-Term Care
Encephalitis
Autopsy
Differential Diagnosis
Steroids
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Light
Neuropathology
Cognitive Dysfunction
Etiology
Cognitive Impairment
Long-term Care
Brain Lesion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Blind and confused. / Sharma, Vibhash D.; Malafronte, Patrick; De Simone, Nicole; Greenberg, Benjamin M.

In: JAMA Neurology, Vol. 70, No. 7, 07.2013, p. 932-936.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sharma, Vibhash D. ; Malafronte, Patrick ; De Simone, Nicole ; Greenberg, Benjamin M. / Blind and confused. In: JAMA Neurology. 2013 ; Vol. 70, No. 7. pp. 932-936.
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