Body site distribution of pediatric-onset morphea and association with extracutaneous manifestations

Yvonne E. Chiu, Leonid Shmuylovich, Tina Kiguradze, Katelyn Anderson, Cathryn Sibbald, Megha Tollefson, Elaine Kunzler, Wynnis L. Tom, Kelsie Bond, Regina Celeste Ahmad, Maria Teresa Garcia-Romero, Mahwish Irfan, Kaitlyn Kollman, Raegan Hunt, Sarah L. Stein, Lisa Arkin, Vivian Wong, Elena Pope, Heidi Jacobe, Heather A. Brandling-BennettKelly M. Cordoro, Lionel Bercovitch, Stephanie M. Rangel, Xuerong Liu, Aniko Szabo, Amy S. Paller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The distribution of pediatric-onset morphea and site-based likelihood for extracutaneous complications has not been well characterized. Objective: To characterize the lesional distribution of pediatric-onset morphea and to determine the sites with the highest association of extracutaneous manifestations. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed. Using clinical photographs, morphea lesions were mapped onto body diagrams using customized software. Results: A total of 823 patients with 2522 lesions were included. Lesions were more frequent on the superior (vs inferior) anterior aspect of the head and extensor (vs flexor) extremities. Linear morphea lesions were more likely on the head and neck, whereas plaque and generalized morphea lesions were more likely on the trunk. Musculoskeletal complications were more likely with lesions on the extensor (vs flexor) extremity (odds ratio [OR], 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-3.4), whereas neurologic manifestations were more likely with lesions on the anterior (vs posterior) (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.7-4.6) and superior (vs inferior) aspect of the head (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.6-3.4). Limitations: Retrospective nature and the inclusion of only patients with clinical photographs. Conclusion: The distribution of pediatric-onset morphea is not random and varies with body site and within individual body sites. The risk stratification of extracutaneous manifestations by body site may inform decisions about screening for extracutaneous manifestations, although prospective studies are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-45
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume85
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • body area
  • body site
  • distribution
  • location
  • morphea
  • scleroderma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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