Cancer Health Impact Program (CHIP): Identifying social and demographic associations of mhealth access and cancer screening behaviors among Brooklyn, New York, residents

Marlene Camacho-Rivera, Samuel L. Rice, Sehyun Oh, Manuel Paris, Ezinne Akpara, Justen Molina, Michael Obadina, Shireene Mcmillan, Joshua L. Mendez Aracena, Jason Morency, Rosario Costas Muniz, Francesca Gany, Carol L. Brown, Jason Gonsky, Joseph R. Osborne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The Bedford-Stuyvesant (BS) and Bushwick (BW) communities of central Brooklyn, New York, are located within the 50-mile core radius of Memorial Sloan Kettering's main catchment area. Cancer is the second leading cause of death among the predominantly African American and Hispanic neighborhoods, with BS and BW having higher prostate cancer and colorectal mortality rates than New York City as a whole. There is significant opportunity to design cancer interventions that leverage the accessibility and acceptability of mobile health (mHealth) tools among the BS and BW communities. Methods: The Cancer Health Impact Program (CHIP) is a collaborative that was formed for this purpose. Through CHIP, we used a tablet-based, Health Information National Trends (HINTS)-based multimodality survey to collect and analyze social and demographic patterns of prostate cancer and colorectal cancer screening, as well as mHealth access, among BS and BW residents. Results: Among 783 participants, 77% reported having a smartphone, 40% reported access to a mobile health application, 17% reported blood stool kit testing, and 26% of men reported PSA test screening. Multivariable logistic regression models results demonstrated that participants who reported owning smartphones, but were unsure whether they had access to a health app, were also significantly more likely to report blood stool kit testing compared with participants without smartphones. In fully adjusted models, access to a health app was not significantly associated with PSA testing. Non-Hispanic white participants were 86% less likely to report blood stool kit testing when compared with non-Hispanic black participants [OR ¼ 0.15; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02–0.49]. Participants with a prior history of cancer were three times more likely to report blood stool kit testing when compared with those without cancer history (OR ¼ 3.18; 95% CI, 1.55–6.63). Conclusions: For blood stool kit testing, significant differences were observed by race/ethnicity, cancer history, age, and smartphone use; for PSA screening, only age was significant in fully adjusted models. Impact: Our results demonstrate that while access to smartphones and mobile health apps may be prevalent among minority communities, other social and demographic characteristics are more likely to influence screening behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)478-485
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2019
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cancer Health Impact Program (CHIP): Identifying social and demographic associations of mhealth access and cancer screening behaviors among Brooklyn, New York, residents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this