Catastrophic anachronisms: The past, present and future of disaster medicine

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Disasters, particularly earthquakes, volcanoes, floods, war-related complications, famine and infectious epidemics, have been a part of recorded human experience. From Pompeii to the Johnston Flood and World War II and the Black Plague to the Spanish Influenza, there have been catastrophic occurrences that will not long be forgotten by either legend or history books. Nevertheless, those occurrences were relatively few and far-between before the mid-twentieth century. Indeed, the nature of disasters has changed since then. From terrorists taking advantage of 'new technology' to weather-related events that cause trillions of dollars worth of damages and economic loss, the world has evolved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIntensive Care Medicine: Annual Update 2006
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages761-772
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)0387301569, 9780387301563
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Disaster Medicine
Disasters
Earthquakes
World War II
Plague
Weather
Starvation
Human Influenza
History
Economics
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Rinnert, K. J., Wigginton, J. G., & Pepe, P. E. (2007). Catastrophic anachronisms: The past, present and future of disaster medicine. In Intensive Care Medicine: Annual Update 2006 (pp. 761-772). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-35096-9_72

Catastrophic anachronisms : The past, present and future of disaster medicine. / Rinnert, K. J.; Wigginton, J. G.; Pepe, P. E.

Intensive Care Medicine: Annual Update 2006. Springer New York, 2007. p. 761-772.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Rinnert, KJ, Wigginton, JG & Pepe, PE 2007, Catastrophic anachronisms: The past, present and future of disaster medicine. in Intensive Care Medicine: Annual Update 2006. Springer New York, pp. 761-772. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-35096-9_72
Rinnert KJ, Wigginton JG, Pepe PE. Catastrophic anachronisms: The past, present and future of disaster medicine. In Intensive Care Medicine: Annual Update 2006. Springer New York. 2007. p. 761-772 https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-35096-9_72
Rinnert, K. J. ; Wigginton, J. G. ; Pepe, P. E. / Catastrophic anachronisms : The past, present and future of disaster medicine. Intensive Care Medicine: Annual Update 2006. Springer New York, 2007. pp. 761-772
@inbook{2d0ae3548ad34d4ebb834f8583c2592e,
title = "Catastrophic anachronisms: The past, present and future of disaster medicine",
abstract = "Disasters, particularly earthquakes, volcanoes, floods, war-related complications, famine and infectious epidemics, have been a part of recorded human experience. From Pompeii to the Johnston Flood and World War II and the Black Plague to the Spanish Influenza, there have been catastrophic occurrences that will not long be forgotten by either legend or history books. Nevertheless, those occurrences were relatively few and far-between before the mid-twentieth century. Indeed, the nature of disasters has changed since then. From terrorists taking advantage of 'new technology' to weather-related events that cause trillions of dollars worth of damages and economic loss, the world has evolved.",
author = "Rinnert, {K. J.} and Wigginton, {J. G.} and Pepe, {P. E.}",
year = "2007",
doi = "10.1007/0-387-35096-9_72",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "0387301569",
pages = "761--772",
booktitle = "Intensive Care Medicine: Annual Update 2006",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Catastrophic anachronisms

T2 - The past, present and future of disaster medicine

AU - Rinnert, K. J.

AU - Wigginton, J. G.

AU - Pepe, P. E.

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Disasters, particularly earthquakes, volcanoes, floods, war-related complications, famine and infectious epidemics, have been a part of recorded human experience. From Pompeii to the Johnston Flood and World War II and the Black Plague to the Spanish Influenza, there have been catastrophic occurrences that will not long be forgotten by either legend or history books. Nevertheless, those occurrences were relatively few and far-between before the mid-twentieth century. Indeed, the nature of disasters has changed since then. From terrorists taking advantage of 'new technology' to weather-related events that cause trillions of dollars worth of damages and economic loss, the world has evolved.

AB - Disasters, particularly earthquakes, volcanoes, floods, war-related complications, famine and infectious epidemics, have been a part of recorded human experience. From Pompeii to the Johnston Flood and World War II and the Black Plague to the Spanish Influenza, there have been catastrophic occurrences that will not long be forgotten by either legend or history books. Nevertheless, those occurrences were relatively few and far-between before the mid-twentieth century. Indeed, the nature of disasters has changed since then. From terrorists taking advantage of 'new technology' to weather-related events that cause trillions of dollars worth of damages and economic loss, the world has evolved.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84892208748&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84892208748&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/0-387-35096-9_72

DO - 10.1007/0-387-35096-9_72

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:84892208748

SN - 0387301569

SN - 9780387301563

SP - 761

EP - 772

BT - Intensive Care Medicine: Annual Update 2006

PB - Springer New York

ER -