Chronic hypoxia impairs murine hippocampal development and depletes the postnatal progenitor pool by attenuating mammalian target of rapamycin signaling

Lakshmi Raman, Xiangmei Kong, Jennifer A. Gilley, Steven G. Kernie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chronic hypoxia (CH) is a major risk factor for impaired cognitive function in various disease states, particularly in the context of cyanotic congenital heart disease. Although most brain development occurs prenatally, the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus harbors progenitor stem cells that contribute to its ongoing development postnatally. It is unclear how exposure to CH might affect postnatal hippocampal development, so we used a transgenic mouse that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) within this progenitor population to determine the effect of CH on the DG. We find that exposure to 10% oxygen from postnatal d 3 to 28 results in a smaller DG with long-term impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis. Because the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a well-known regulator of cell proliferation and growth and is sensitive to hypoxia, we investigated its activation on exposure to CH and find it to be attenuated specifically in neural progenitor cells. Systemic inhibition of the mTOR pathway using rapamycin also caused impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis that mimics exposure to CH. Our findings demonstrate that CH results in long-term impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis and is mediated, in part, by attenuation of the mTOR pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-165
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Research
Volume70
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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