Circulating mutant DNA to assess tumor dynamics

Frank Diehl, Kerstin Schmidt, Michael A. Choti, Katharine Romans, Steven Goodman, Meng Li, Katherine Thornton, Nishant Agrawal, Lori Sokoll, Steve A. Szabo, Kenneth W. Kinzler, Bert Vogelstein, Luis A. Diaz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1077 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The measurement of circulating nucleic acids has transformed the management of chronic viral infections such as HIV. The development of analogous markers for individuals with cancer could similarly enhance the management of their disease. DNA containing somatic mutations is highly tumor specific and thus, in theory, can provide optimum markers. However, the number of circulating mutant gene fragments is small compared to the number of normal circulating DNA fragments, making it difficult to detect and quantify them with the sensitivity required for meaningful clinical use. In this study, we applied a highly sensitive approach to quantify circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in 162 plasma samples from 18 subjects undergoing multimodality therapy for colorectal cancer. We found that ctDNA measurements could be used to reliably monitor tumor dynamics in subjects with cancer who were undergoing surgery or chemotherapy. We suggest that this personalized genetic approach could be generally applied to individuals with other types of cancer (pages 914-915).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)985-990
Number of pages6
JournalNature Medicine
Volume14
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

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Tumors
DNA
Neoplasms
Chemotherapy
Surgery
Nucleic Acids
Genes
Plasmas
Virus Diseases
Disease Management
Colorectal Neoplasms
HIV
Drug Therapy
Mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Diehl, F., Schmidt, K., Choti, M. A., Romans, K., Goodman, S., Li, M., ... Diaz, L. A. (2008). Circulating mutant DNA to assess tumor dynamics. Nature Medicine, 14(9), 985-990. https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.1789

Circulating mutant DNA to assess tumor dynamics. / Diehl, Frank; Schmidt, Kerstin; Choti, Michael A.; Romans, Katharine; Goodman, Steven; Li, Meng; Thornton, Katherine; Agrawal, Nishant; Sokoll, Lori; Szabo, Steve A.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Diaz, Luis A.

In: Nature Medicine, Vol. 14, No. 9, 09.2008, p. 985-990.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Diehl, F, Schmidt, K, Choti, MA, Romans, K, Goodman, S, Li, M, Thornton, K, Agrawal, N, Sokoll, L, Szabo, SA, Kinzler, KW, Vogelstein, B & Diaz, LA 2008, 'Circulating mutant DNA to assess tumor dynamics', Nature Medicine, vol. 14, no. 9, pp. 985-990. https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.1789
Diehl F, Schmidt K, Choti MA, Romans K, Goodman S, Li M et al. Circulating mutant DNA to assess tumor dynamics. Nature Medicine. 2008 Sep;14(9):985-990. https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.1789
Diehl, Frank ; Schmidt, Kerstin ; Choti, Michael A. ; Romans, Katharine ; Goodman, Steven ; Li, Meng ; Thornton, Katherine ; Agrawal, Nishant ; Sokoll, Lori ; Szabo, Steve A. ; Kinzler, Kenneth W. ; Vogelstein, Bert ; Diaz, Luis A. / Circulating mutant DNA to assess tumor dynamics. In: Nature Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 14, No. 9. pp. 985-990.
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