Clinical and Hematologic Benefits of Partial Splenectomy for Congenital Hemolytic Anemias in Children

Henry E. Rice, Keith T. Oldham, Cheryl A. Hillery, Michael A. Skinner, Sara M. O'Hara, Russell E. Ware

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the role of partial splenectomy for symptomatic children with various congenital hemolytic anemias. Summary Background Data: The use of total splenectomy for symptomatic children with congenital hemolytic anemias is restricted by concern of postsplenectomy sepsis. A partial splenectomy is an alternative procedure, although its utility remains incompletely defined. Methods: This longitudinal cohort study followed 25 symptomatic children with various congenital anemias who underwent partial splenectomy. Sixteen children had hereditary spherocytosis (HS), and nine children had other erythrocyte disorders. Outcome measures were clinical and laboratory hemolysis, splenic phagocytic and immune function, and splenic regrowth as measured by ultrasonography. Discrete parameters were compared using the Student t test. Results: Partial splenectomy was successful in all 25 children, with minimal morbidity. Follow-up ranged from 7 months to 6 years (mean 2.3 ± 1.5 years). Following surgery, children with HS had increased hemoglobin values, decreased reticulocyte and bilirubin levels, and preserved splenic function. Most children without HS had decreased symptoms of hypersplenism and splenic sequestration. Over time, variable rates of splenic regrowth were noted, although regrowth did not necessarily correlate with recurrent hemolysis. Conclusions: In children with hereditary spherocytosis, a partial splenectomy appears to control hemolysis while retaining splenic function. In children with other congenital hemolytic anemias, a partial splenectomy appears to control symptoms of hypersplenism and splenic sequestration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)281-288
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Surgery
Volume237
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2003

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Congenital Hemolytic Anemia
Splenectomy
Hereditary Spherocytosis
Hemolysis
Hypersplenism
Reticulocytes
Bilirubin
Longitudinal Studies
Anemia
Ultrasonography
Sepsis
Hemoglobins
Cohort Studies
Erythrocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Rice, H. E., Oldham, K. T., Hillery, C. A., Skinner, M. A., O'Hara, S. M., & Ware, R. E. (2003). Clinical and Hematologic Benefits of Partial Splenectomy for Congenital Hemolytic Anemias in Children. Annals of Surgery, 237(2), 281-288. https://doi.org/10.1097/00000658-200302000-00019

Clinical and Hematologic Benefits of Partial Splenectomy for Congenital Hemolytic Anemias in Children. / Rice, Henry E.; Oldham, Keith T.; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Skinner, Michael A.; O'Hara, Sara M.; Ware, Russell E.

In: Annals of Surgery, Vol. 237, No. 2, 02.2003, p. 281-288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rice, HE, Oldham, KT, Hillery, CA, Skinner, MA, O'Hara, SM & Ware, RE 2003, 'Clinical and Hematologic Benefits of Partial Splenectomy for Congenital Hemolytic Anemias in Children', Annals of Surgery, vol. 237, no. 2, pp. 281-288. https://doi.org/10.1097/00000658-200302000-00019
Rice, Henry E. ; Oldham, Keith T. ; Hillery, Cheryl A. ; Skinner, Michael A. ; O'Hara, Sara M. ; Ware, Russell E. / Clinical and Hematologic Benefits of Partial Splenectomy for Congenital Hemolytic Anemias in Children. In: Annals of Surgery. 2003 ; Vol. 237, No. 2. pp. 281-288.
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