Community events as viable sites for recruiting minority volunteers who agree to be contacted for future research

Wendy Pechero Bishop, Jasmin A. Tiro, Simon J Craddock Lee, Corinne M. Bruce, Celette Sugg Skinner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reaching out to medically underserved racial/ethnic groups is a key challenge in population research. To increase their participation opportunities, we asked adults attending community events to complete a survey about their health concerns and invited them to join a registry of individuals agreeing to future study invitation. Approximately 66% of the 2298 survey responders joined the registry. Multivariate analysis showed that Hispanics were more likely to agree to contact than Whites. Agreers endorsed a wider range of health concerns than non-agreers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-371
Number of pages3
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

Fingerprint

Registries
Volunteers
Health
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
Multivariate Analysis
Research
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Community events
  • Minority recruitment
  • Registry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Community events as viable sites for recruiting minority volunteers who agree to be contacted for future research. / Bishop, Wendy Pechero; Tiro, Jasmin A.; Lee, Simon J Craddock; Bruce, Corinne M.; Skinner, Celette Sugg.

In: Contemporary Clinical Trials, Vol. 32, No. 3, 05.2011, p. 369-371.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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