Comparison of BOLD Contrast and Gd-DTPA Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in Rat Prostate Tumor

Lan Jiang, Dawen Zhao, Anca Constantinescu, Ralph P. Mason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

The microcirculation and oxygenation of a tumor play important roles in its responsiveness to cytotoxic treatment, and noninvasive assessments of Its vascular properties may have prognostic value. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) 1H MRI based on infusion of Gd-DTPA, and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast based on altering inhaled gas are both sensitive to vascular characteristics. This study compares the effects observed in eight Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 rat tumors imaged sequentially at 4.7 Tesla by echo-planar imaging (EPI). Both interventions generated a significant response, and each revealed significant differences between the center and periphery of the tumors. On a voxel-by-voxel basis across the whole tumor population, there was a close correlation between the maximum rate of signal response and the magnitude of response to each intervention (R2 ≥ 0.6, P < 0.0001). However, when the data were analyzed separately for each individual tumor, some showed a weak correlation (R2 < 0.4), particularly for DCE, and the nature (slope) varied between separate tumors. Generally, there was a weak correlation (N = 7, R2 < 0.5) between responses to the two interventions on a tumor-by-tumor basis, which emphasizes that the techniques are not equivalent. Both techniques revealed intra- and intertumor heterogeneity, but the BOLD response was more rapidly reversible than the DCE response. This suggests that the BOLD technique may be a useful tool for investigating interventions (such as drugs) that cause vascular disruption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)953-960
Number of pages8
JournalMagnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume51
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2004

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Keywords

  • BOLD
  • Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI
  • Gd-DTPA
  • Oxygen
  • Prostate tumor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

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