Complications of primary total hip arthroplasty in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with femoral head osteonecrosis

Tyler R. Youngman, Dietrich W. Riepen, Dustin B. Rinehart, Dharani Rohit Thota, Joshua J. Sun, Clara L. Telford, Michael H. Huo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Femoral head osteonecrosis (FHON) is a well-recognised complication in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a reliable solution to FHON and has provided functional improvement and pain relief in these patients. Higher complication rates, in particular infections, have been reported in the series of THAs done in the HIV-positive patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the complication rate of THA for FHON in HIV-positive patients managed with the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) protocols. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of HIV-positive patients with FHON who underwent THAs over a 10-year period at a single institution. Results: A total of 56 THAs (44 patients) met the inclusion criteria. The mean age at the time of THAs was 47 (range 34–60) years. Of the 44 patients, 39 (88.6%) were males. The mean follow-up was 6.6 (range 2.0–11.3) years. The overall complication rate was 12.5%, with 2 (3.6%) cases of deep periprosthetic infections. Conclusions: HIV-positive patients with FHON undergoing THAs do have a considerable complication rate (12.5%). The deep periprosthetic infection rate (3.6%) in these patients, however, has decreased with contemporary disease modification protocols.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHIP International
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Avascular necrosis
  • HIV
  • femoral head osteonecrosis
  • infection
  • total hip arthroplasty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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