Congenital foregut duplication cysts of the anterior tongue

Debbie Eaton, Kathleen Billings, Charles Timmons, Timothy Booth, J. Michael J Biavati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To review our experience with foregut duplication cysts of the anterior tongue, an unusual and rarely encountered mass in this location. Design: A retrospective review of patients with anterior tongue foregut duplication cysts identified between 1990 and 2000. Setting: Academic, tertiary care children's medical center. Patients: Six pediatric patients (5 boys and 1 girl) ranging in age from birth to 8 months at diagnosis. Intervention: Three patients underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All 6 patients underwent excisional biopsy. Main Outcome Measures: Clinical description of foregut duplication cysts, ability to make the diagnosis preoperatively, and recurrence rates. Results: No patient presented with respiratory compromise, despite the large size of the anterior tongue masses (range, 1.5-2.4 cm). An MRI study was performed in 3 patients, all given a presumptive diagnosis of dermoid cyst based on the radiographic findings. No patient was diagnosed correctly prior to surgical excision. All patients underwent surgical excision, and the average time from birth to surgical excision was 11 months (range, 3 days to 3.7 years). Surgical pathologic findings were reported as a foregut duplication cyst (enterocystoma) in all patients, with 3 specimens containing foci of gastric mucosa. No recurrence has occurred at 1-month follow-up. Conclusions: Foregut duplication cysts rarely present in the anterior tongue and are easily misdiagnosed preoperatively. An MRI study is helpful in preoperative planning, although all lesions were radiologically indistinguishable from dermoid cysts. These masses may be an underappreciated entity in the differential diagnosis of congenital anterior tongue masses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1484-1487
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume127
Issue number12
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Tongue
Cysts
Dermoid Cyst
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Parturition
Recurrence
Tertiary Healthcare
Gastric Mucosa
Diagnostic Errors
Differential Diagnosis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pediatrics
Biopsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Congenital foregut duplication cysts of the anterior tongue. / Eaton, Debbie; Billings, Kathleen; Timmons, Charles; Booth, Timothy; Biavati, J. Michael J.

In: Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 127, No. 12, 2001, p. 1484-1487.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eaton, Debbie ; Billings, Kathleen ; Timmons, Charles ; Booth, Timothy ; Biavati, J. Michael J. / Congenital foregut duplication cysts of the anterior tongue. In: Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. 2001 ; Vol. 127, No. 12. pp. 1484-1487.
@article{67e5f3448d874bb2989dc94ee222a9a0,
title = "Congenital foregut duplication cysts of the anterior tongue",
abstract = "Objective: To review our experience with foregut duplication cysts of the anterior tongue, an unusual and rarely encountered mass in this location. Design: A retrospective review of patients with anterior tongue foregut duplication cysts identified between 1990 and 2000. Setting: Academic, tertiary care children's medical center. Patients: Six pediatric patients (5 boys and 1 girl) ranging in age from birth to 8 months at diagnosis. Intervention: Three patients underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All 6 patients underwent excisional biopsy. Main Outcome Measures: Clinical description of foregut duplication cysts, ability to make the diagnosis preoperatively, and recurrence rates. Results: No patient presented with respiratory compromise, despite the large size of the anterior tongue masses (range, 1.5-2.4 cm). An MRI study was performed in 3 patients, all given a presumptive diagnosis of dermoid cyst based on the radiographic findings. No patient was diagnosed correctly prior to surgical excision. All patients underwent surgical excision, and the average time from birth to surgical excision was 11 months (range, 3 days to 3.7 years). Surgical pathologic findings were reported as a foregut duplication cyst (enterocystoma) in all patients, with 3 specimens containing foci of gastric mucosa. No recurrence has occurred at 1-month follow-up. Conclusions: Foregut duplication cysts rarely present in the anterior tongue and are easily misdiagnosed preoperatively. An MRI study is helpful in preoperative planning, although all lesions were radiologically indistinguishable from dermoid cysts. These masses may be an underappreciated entity in the differential diagnosis of congenital anterior tongue masses.",
author = "Debbie Eaton and Kathleen Billings and Charles Timmons and Timothy Booth and Biavati, {J. Michael J}",
year = "2001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "127",
pages = "1484--1487",
journal = "JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery",
issn = "2168-6181",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Congenital foregut duplication cysts of the anterior tongue

AU - Eaton, Debbie

AU - Billings, Kathleen

AU - Timmons, Charles

AU - Booth, Timothy

AU - Biavati, J. Michael J

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Objective: To review our experience with foregut duplication cysts of the anterior tongue, an unusual and rarely encountered mass in this location. Design: A retrospective review of patients with anterior tongue foregut duplication cysts identified between 1990 and 2000. Setting: Academic, tertiary care children's medical center. Patients: Six pediatric patients (5 boys and 1 girl) ranging in age from birth to 8 months at diagnosis. Intervention: Three patients underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All 6 patients underwent excisional biopsy. Main Outcome Measures: Clinical description of foregut duplication cysts, ability to make the diagnosis preoperatively, and recurrence rates. Results: No patient presented with respiratory compromise, despite the large size of the anterior tongue masses (range, 1.5-2.4 cm). An MRI study was performed in 3 patients, all given a presumptive diagnosis of dermoid cyst based on the radiographic findings. No patient was diagnosed correctly prior to surgical excision. All patients underwent surgical excision, and the average time from birth to surgical excision was 11 months (range, 3 days to 3.7 years). Surgical pathologic findings were reported as a foregut duplication cyst (enterocystoma) in all patients, with 3 specimens containing foci of gastric mucosa. No recurrence has occurred at 1-month follow-up. Conclusions: Foregut duplication cysts rarely present in the anterior tongue and are easily misdiagnosed preoperatively. An MRI study is helpful in preoperative planning, although all lesions were radiologically indistinguishable from dermoid cysts. These masses may be an underappreciated entity in the differential diagnosis of congenital anterior tongue masses.

AB - Objective: To review our experience with foregut duplication cysts of the anterior tongue, an unusual and rarely encountered mass in this location. Design: A retrospective review of patients with anterior tongue foregut duplication cysts identified between 1990 and 2000. Setting: Academic, tertiary care children's medical center. Patients: Six pediatric patients (5 boys and 1 girl) ranging in age from birth to 8 months at diagnosis. Intervention: Three patients underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All 6 patients underwent excisional biopsy. Main Outcome Measures: Clinical description of foregut duplication cysts, ability to make the diagnosis preoperatively, and recurrence rates. Results: No patient presented with respiratory compromise, despite the large size of the anterior tongue masses (range, 1.5-2.4 cm). An MRI study was performed in 3 patients, all given a presumptive diagnosis of dermoid cyst based on the radiographic findings. No patient was diagnosed correctly prior to surgical excision. All patients underwent surgical excision, and the average time from birth to surgical excision was 11 months (range, 3 days to 3.7 years). Surgical pathologic findings were reported as a foregut duplication cyst (enterocystoma) in all patients, with 3 specimens containing foci of gastric mucosa. No recurrence has occurred at 1-month follow-up. Conclusions: Foregut duplication cysts rarely present in the anterior tongue and are easily misdiagnosed preoperatively. An MRI study is helpful in preoperative planning, although all lesions were radiologically indistinguishable from dermoid cysts. These masses may be an underappreciated entity in the differential diagnosis of congenital anterior tongue masses.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035217013&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035217013&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 127

SP - 1484

EP - 1487

JO - JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

JF - JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

SN - 2168-6181

IS - 12

ER -