Construct validity and invariance of four factors associated with colorectal cancer screening across gender, race, and prior screening

Amy McQueen, Jasmin A. Tiro, Sally W. Vernon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding individuals' perceptions of colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) is important for developing effective interventions to increase adherence to screening guidelines. Theory-based cognitive and psychosocial constructs have been associated with CRCS in the literature, but few studies have evaluated the psychometric properties of such measures. We hypothesized a correlated four-factor model, including CRCS perceived pros, cons, social influence, and self-efficacy. We also examined measurement invariance across subgroups based on gender, race (white; African American), and prior CRCS experience (never; overdue for repeat screening). We used baseline (n = 1,250) and 2-week (n = 1,036) follow-upsu rvey data from participants in a behavioral intervention trial designed to increase CRCS. Only minor modifications were made to the hypothesized model to improve fit, and the final model was confirmed with a random half of the sample, as well as with follow-upda ta. Results support the hypothesized unidimensional construct measures and suggest that the itemsmay be appropriate for all subgroups examined. Greater variance in responses to items assessing the perceived cons of CRCS was found among African Americans compared with whites, suggesting that race may moderate the association between perceived cons and CRCS in this sample. Pros, cons, social influence, and self-efficacy are associated with CRCS; therefore, using scales with known psychometric properties strengthens researchers' ability to draw conclusions about group differences and changes over time and to compare their results with other studies. Replication studies in other populations are needed to provide further evidence of construct validity for the scales reported here.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2231-2237
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume17
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

Fingerprint

Early Detection of Cancer
Colorectal Neoplasms
Self Efficacy
Psychometrics
African Americans
Aptitude
Research Personnel
Guidelines
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

@article{046104a005194205999a2f67a25465fa,
title = "Construct validity and invariance of four factors associated with colorectal cancer screening across gender, race, and prior screening",
abstract = "Understanding individuals' perceptions of colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) is important for developing effective interventions to increase adherence to screening guidelines. Theory-based cognitive and psychosocial constructs have been associated with CRCS in the literature, but few studies have evaluated the psychometric properties of such measures. We hypothesized a correlated four-factor model, including CRCS perceived pros, cons, social influence, and self-efficacy. We also examined measurement invariance across subgroups based on gender, race (white; African American), and prior CRCS experience (never; overdue for repeat screening). We used baseline (n = 1,250) and 2-week (n = 1,036) follow-upsu rvey data from participants in a behavioral intervention trial designed to increase CRCS. Only minor modifications were made to the hypothesized model to improve fit, and the final model was confirmed with a random half of the sample, as well as with follow-upda ta. Results support the hypothesized unidimensional construct measures and suggest that the itemsmay be appropriate for all subgroups examined. Greater variance in responses to items assessing the perceived cons of CRCS was found among African Americans compared with whites, suggesting that race may moderate the association between perceived cons and CRCS in this sample. Pros, cons, social influence, and self-efficacy are associated with CRCS; therefore, using scales with known psychometric properties strengthens researchers' ability to draw conclusions about group differences and changes over time and to compare their results with other studies. Replication studies in other populations are needed to provide further evidence of construct validity for the scales reported here.",
author = "Amy McQueen and Tiro, {Jasmin A.} and Vernon, {Sally W.}",
year = "2008",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0176",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "2231--2237",
journal = "Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention",
issn = "1055-9965",
publisher = "American Association for Cancer Research Inc.",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Construct validity and invariance of four factors associated with colorectal cancer screening across gender, race, and prior screening

AU - McQueen, Amy

AU - Tiro, Jasmin A.

AU - Vernon, Sally W.

PY - 2008/9

Y1 - 2008/9

N2 - Understanding individuals' perceptions of colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) is important for developing effective interventions to increase adherence to screening guidelines. Theory-based cognitive and psychosocial constructs have been associated with CRCS in the literature, but few studies have evaluated the psychometric properties of such measures. We hypothesized a correlated four-factor model, including CRCS perceived pros, cons, social influence, and self-efficacy. We also examined measurement invariance across subgroups based on gender, race (white; African American), and prior CRCS experience (never; overdue for repeat screening). We used baseline (n = 1,250) and 2-week (n = 1,036) follow-upsu rvey data from participants in a behavioral intervention trial designed to increase CRCS. Only minor modifications were made to the hypothesized model to improve fit, and the final model was confirmed with a random half of the sample, as well as with follow-upda ta. Results support the hypothesized unidimensional construct measures and suggest that the itemsmay be appropriate for all subgroups examined. Greater variance in responses to items assessing the perceived cons of CRCS was found among African Americans compared with whites, suggesting that race may moderate the association between perceived cons and CRCS in this sample. Pros, cons, social influence, and self-efficacy are associated with CRCS; therefore, using scales with known psychometric properties strengthens researchers' ability to draw conclusions about group differences and changes over time and to compare their results with other studies. Replication studies in other populations are needed to provide further evidence of construct validity for the scales reported here.

AB - Understanding individuals' perceptions of colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) is important for developing effective interventions to increase adherence to screening guidelines. Theory-based cognitive and psychosocial constructs have been associated with CRCS in the literature, but few studies have evaluated the psychometric properties of such measures. We hypothesized a correlated four-factor model, including CRCS perceived pros, cons, social influence, and self-efficacy. We also examined measurement invariance across subgroups based on gender, race (white; African American), and prior CRCS experience (never; overdue for repeat screening). We used baseline (n = 1,250) and 2-week (n = 1,036) follow-upsu rvey data from participants in a behavioral intervention trial designed to increase CRCS. Only minor modifications were made to the hypothesized model to improve fit, and the final model was confirmed with a random half of the sample, as well as with follow-upda ta. Results support the hypothesized unidimensional construct measures and suggest that the itemsmay be appropriate for all subgroups examined. Greater variance in responses to items assessing the perceived cons of CRCS was found among African Americans compared with whites, suggesting that race may moderate the association between perceived cons and CRCS in this sample. Pros, cons, social influence, and self-efficacy are associated with CRCS; therefore, using scales with known psychometric properties strengthens researchers' ability to draw conclusions about group differences and changes over time and to compare their results with other studies. Replication studies in other populations are needed to provide further evidence of construct validity for the scales reported here.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=53349120238&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=53349120238&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0176

DO - 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0176

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 2231

EP - 2237

JO - Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

JF - Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

SN - 1055-9965

IS - 9

ER -