Conventional measurement of renal function utilizing serum creatine, creatine clearance, inulin and para-aminohippuric acid clearance

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104 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inulin and para-aminohippuric acid clearances, determined by the conventional method of continuous intravenous infusion with blood and urine sample collections, are the gold standards for estimating glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow, respectively. Creatinine clearance provides a reasonably good estimate of glomerular filtration rate but is still subject to errors in accuracy and precision. However, novel methods employing cimetidine to block renal tubular creatinine secretion hold promise for improving the accuracy of estimates. More importantly, a large (and growing) number of studies have consistently demonstrated that estimating glomerular filtration rate by creatinine clearance calculated from the Cockcroft-Gault formula is better than measuring creatinine clearance with a 24-h urine collection. Until newer, more simple methods are developed, calculating creatinine clearance using fasting serum creatinine level, body weight, age and sex provides a reasonable and clinically useful bedside measure of glomerular filtration rate for the practising clinician.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)505-509
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension
Volume4
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1995

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p-Aminohippuric Acid
Inulin
Creatine
Creatinine
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Kidney
Serum
Urine Specimen Collection
Renal Plasma Flow
Cimetidine
Intravenous Infusions
Fasting
Body Weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

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abstract = "Inulin and para-aminohippuric acid clearances, determined by the conventional method of continuous intravenous infusion with blood and urine sample collections, are the gold standards for estimating glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow, respectively. Creatinine clearance provides a reasonably good estimate of glomerular filtration rate but is still subject to errors in accuracy and precision. However, novel methods employing cimetidine to block renal tubular creatinine secretion hold promise for improving the accuracy of estimates. More importantly, a large (and growing) number of studies have consistently demonstrated that estimating glomerular filtration rate by creatinine clearance calculated from the Cockcroft-Gault formula is better than measuring creatinine clearance with a 24-h urine collection. Until newer, more simple methods are developed, calculating creatinine clearance using fasting serum creatinine level, body weight, age and sex provides a reasonable and clinically useful bedside measure of glomerular filtration rate for the practising clinician.",
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