Creation, Implementation, and Assessment of a General Thoracic Surgery Simulation Course in Rwanda

Adriana G. Ramirez, Nebil Nuradin, Fidele Byiringiro, Robinson Ssebuufu, George J. Stukenborg, Georges Ntakiyiruta, Thomas M. Daniel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The primary objective was to provide proof of concept of conducting thoracic surgical simulation in a low-middle income country. Secondary objectives were to accelerate general thoracic surgery skills acquisition by general surgery residents and sustain simulation surgery teaching through a website, simulation models, and teaching of local faculty. Methods: Five training models were created for use in a low-middle income country setting and implemented during on-site courses with Rwandan general surgery residents. A website <http://thoracicsurgeryeducation.com> was created as a supplement to the on-site teaching. All participants completed a course knowledge assessment before and after the simulation and feedback/confidence surveys. Descriptive and univariate analyses were performed on participants’ responses. Results: Twenty-three participants completed the simulation course. Eight (35%) had previous training with the course models. All training levels were represented. Participants reported higher rates of meaningful confidence, defined as moderate to complete on a Likert scale, for all simulated thoracic procedures (p < 0.05). The overall mean knowledge assessment score improved from 42.5% presimulation to 78.6% postsimulation, (p < 0.0001). When stratified by procedure, the mean scores for each simulated procedure showed statistically significant improvement, except for ruptured diaphragm repair (p = 0.45). Conclusions: General thoracic surgery simulation provides a practical, inexpensive, and expedited learning experience in settings lacking experienced faculty and fellowship training opportunities. Resident feedback showed enhanced confidence and knowledge of thoracic procedures suggesting simulation surgery could be an effective tool in expanding the resident knowledge base and preparedness for performing clinically needed thoracic procedures. Repeated skills exposure remains a challenge for achieving sustainable progress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1842-1849
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume105
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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