Cutting edge: Salmonella AvrA effector inhibits the key proinflammatory, anti-apoptotic NF-κB pathway

Lauren S. Collier-Hyams, Hui Zeng, Jun Sun, Amelia D. Tomlinson, Zhao Qin Bao, Huaqun Chen, James L. Madara, Kim Orth, Andrew S. Neish

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

202 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Secreted prokaryotic effector proteins have evolved to modulate the cellular functions of specific eukaryotic hosts. Generally, these proteins are considered virulence factors that facilitate parasitism. However, in certain plant and insect eukaryotic/prokaryotic relationships, effector proteins are involved in the establishment of commensal or symbiotic interactions. In this study, we report that the AvrA protein from Salmonella typhimurium, a common enteropathogen of humans, is an effector molecule that inhibits activation of the key proinflammatory NF-κB transcription factor and augments apoptosis in human epithelial cells. This activity is similar but mechanistically distinct from that described for YopJ, an AvrA homolog expressed by the bacterial pathogen Yersinia. We suggest that AvrA may limit virulence in vertebrates in a manner analogous to avirulence factors in plants, and as such, is the first bacterial effector from a mammalian pathogen that has been ascribed such a function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2846-2850
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume169
Issue number6
StatePublished - Sep 15 2002

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Salmonella
Yersinia
Proteins
Virulence Factors
Virulence
Insects
Vertebrates
Transcription Factors
Epithelial Cells
Apoptosis
3'-(1-butylphosphoryl)adenosine
Salmonella typhimurium AvrA protein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Collier-Hyams, L. S., Zeng, H., Sun, J., Tomlinson, A. D., Bao, Z. Q., Chen, H., ... Neish, A. S. (2002). Cutting edge: Salmonella AvrA effector inhibits the key proinflammatory, anti-apoptotic NF-κB pathway. Journal of Immunology, 169(6), 2846-2850.

Cutting edge : Salmonella AvrA effector inhibits the key proinflammatory, anti-apoptotic NF-κB pathway. / Collier-Hyams, Lauren S.; Zeng, Hui; Sun, Jun; Tomlinson, Amelia D.; Bao, Zhao Qin; Chen, Huaqun; Madara, James L.; Orth, Kim; Neish, Andrew S.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 169, No. 6, 15.09.2002, p. 2846-2850.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Collier-Hyams, LS, Zeng, H, Sun, J, Tomlinson, AD, Bao, ZQ, Chen, H, Madara, JL, Orth, K & Neish, AS 2002, 'Cutting edge: Salmonella AvrA effector inhibits the key proinflammatory, anti-apoptotic NF-κB pathway', Journal of Immunology, vol. 169, no. 6, pp. 2846-2850.
Collier-Hyams LS, Zeng H, Sun J, Tomlinson AD, Bao ZQ, Chen H et al. Cutting edge: Salmonella AvrA effector inhibits the key proinflammatory, anti-apoptotic NF-κB pathway. Journal of Immunology. 2002 Sep 15;169(6):2846-2850.
Collier-Hyams, Lauren S. ; Zeng, Hui ; Sun, Jun ; Tomlinson, Amelia D. ; Bao, Zhao Qin ; Chen, Huaqun ; Madara, James L. ; Orth, Kim ; Neish, Andrew S. / Cutting edge : Salmonella AvrA effector inhibits the key proinflammatory, anti-apoptotic NF-κB pathway. In: Journal of Immunology. 2002 ; Vol. 169, No. 6. pp. 2846-2850.
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