Decreased gray matter concentration in the insular, orbitofrontal, cingulate, and temporal cortices of cocaine patients

Teresa R. Franklin, Paul D. Acton, Joseph A Maldjian, Jason D. Gray, Jason R. Croft, Charles A. Dackis, Charles P. O'Brien, Anna Rose Childress

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

444 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Structural deficiencies within limbic and prefrontal regions may contribute to the characteristic drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviors that prevail in persons dependent on cocaine. To date, a focal structural analysis of the brains of cocaine patients has not been undertaken. Methods: We used voxel based morphometry in conjunction with statistical parametric mapping on the structural magnetic resonance images of cocaine-dependent (n = 13) and cocaine-naive individuals (n = 16) to assess differences between the two groups in gray and white matter concentration. Results: We report a decrease in gray matter concentration in the ventromedial orbitofrontal, anterior cingulate, anteroventral insular, and superior temporal cortices of cocaine patients in comparison to controls (p < .01 corrected for multiple comparisons). The average percentage decrease in gray matter concentration within a region ranged from 5% to 11%. White matter concentration did not differ between groups. Conclusions: We conclude that the brains of cocaine patients are structurally dissimilar from those of nondrug-using controls. The differences were detected in regions involved in decision-making, behavioral inhibition and assignation of emotional valence to environmental stimuli and, hence, may contribute to some of the behavioral deficits characteristic of chronic cocaine users.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)134-142
Number of pages9
JournalBiological Psychiatry
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2002

Keywords

  • Cocaine
  • Insular cortex
  • Orbitofrontal cortex
  • Structural MRI
  • Voxel based morphometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Decreased gray matter concentration in the insular, orbitofrontal, cingulate, and temporal cortices of cocaine patients'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Franklin, T. R., Acton, P. D., Maldjian, J. A., Gray, J. D., Croft, J. R., Dackis, C. A., O'Brien, C. P., & Childress, A. R. (2002). Decreased gray matter concentration in the insular, orbitofrontal, cingulate, and temporal cortices of cocaine patients. Biological Psychiatry, 51(2), 134-142. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0006-3223(01)01269-0