Depression and parenting by nonoffending mothers of children who experienced sexual abuse

Eileen J. Santa-Sosa, Robert A. Steer, Esther Deblinger, Melissa K. Runyon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Parenting may be one mechanism by which depression in nonoffending mothers impacts child emotional and behavioral adjustment after sexual abuse. This study examined the relationship between self-reported maternal depression and parenting behaviors by nonoffending mothers of children who experienced sexual abuse. The participants were 204 nonoffending biological mother-child pairs recruited from a clinic providing services for children who experienced sexual abuse. The mothers completed pretreatment self-report measures of demographic information, depression, and parenting behaviors. Children (7 to 17 years) completed a measure of mothers parenting behaviors. Mothers with clinically high levels of self-reported depression employed more inconsistent parenting behavior and provided poorer monitoring/supervision of their children than mothers without clinically high levels of self-reported depression. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)915-930
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Child Sexual Abuse
Volume22
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

Keywords

  • Beck Depression Inventory
  • child sexual abuse
  • mothers
  • parenting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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