Depression and parenting by nonoffending mothers of children who experienced sexual abuse

Eileen J. Santa-Sosa, Robert A. Steer, Esther Deblinger, Melissa K. Runyon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Parenting may be one mechanism by which depression in nonoffending mothers impacts child emotional and behavioral adjustment after sexual abuse. This study examined the relationship between self-reported maternal depression and parenting behaviors by nonoffending mothers of children who experienced sexual abuse. The participants were 204 nonoffending biological mother-child pairs recruited from a clinic providing services for children who experienced sexual abuse. The mothers completed pretreatment self-report measures of demographic information, depression, and parenting behaviors. Children (7 to 17 years) completed a measure of mothers parenting behaviors. Mothers with clinically high levels of self-reported depression employed more inconsistent parenting behavior and provided poorer monitoring/supervision of their children than mothers without clinically high levels of self-reported depression. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)915-930
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Child Sexual Abuse
Volume22
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

Keywords

  • Beck Depression Inventory
  • child sexual abuse
  • mothers
  • parenting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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