Developing a comprehensive, proficiency-based training program for robotic surgery

Genevieve Dulan, Robert V Rege, Deborah C. Hogg, Kristine M. Gilberg-Fisher, Nabeel A. Arain, Seifu T. Tesfay, Daniel J Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Robotically assisted surgery has become very popular for numerous surgical disciplines, yet training practices remain variable with little to no validation. The purpose of this study was to develop a comprehensive, proficiency-based robotic training program. Methods: A skill deconstruction list was generated by observation of robotic operations and interviews with experts. Available resources were used, and other components were developed as needed to develop a comprehensive, proficiency-based curriculum to teach all deconstructed skills. Preliminary construct and content validity and curriculum feasibility were evaluated. Results: The skill deconstruction list contained 23 items. Curricular components included an online tutorial, a half-day interactive session, and 9 inanimate exercises with objective metrics. Novice (546 ± 26) and expert (923 ± 60) inanimate composite scores were different (P <.001), supporting construct validity, and substantial pre-test to post-test improvement was noted after successful training completion. All 23 deconstructed skills were rated as highly relevant (4.9 ± 0.5; 5-point scale), and no skills were absent from the curriculum, supporting content validity. Conclusion: These data suggest that this proficiency-based training curriculum comprehensively addresses the skills necessary to perform robotic operations with early construct and content validity and feasibility demonstrated. Further validation is encouraged.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)477-488
Number of pages12
JournalSurgery (United States)
Volume152
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

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Robotics
Curriculum
Education
Observation
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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Developing a comprehensive, proficiency-based training program for robotic surgery. / Dulan, Genevieve; Rege, Robert V; Hogg, Deborah C.; Gilberg-Fisher, Kristine M.; Arain, Nabeel A.; Tesfay, Seifu T.; Scott, Daniel J.

In: Surgery (United States), Vol. 152, No. 3, 09.2012, p. 477-488.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dulan, Genevieve ; Rege, Robert V ; Hogg, Deborah C. ; Gilberg-Fisher, Kristine M. ; Arain, Nabeel A. ; Tesfay, Seifu T. ; Scott, Daniel J. / Developing a comprehensive, proficiency-based training program for robotic surgery. In: Surgery (United States). 2012 ; Vol. 152, No. 3. pp. 477-488.
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