Differential disclosure across social network ties among women living with HIV

Eric Rice, Scott Comulada, Sara Green, Elizabeth Mayfield Arnold, Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Women's disclosure of their HIV serostatus across social network ties was examined in a sample of women living in Los Angeles (n = 234), using multivariate random intercept logistic regressions. Women with disclosure-averse attitudes were less likely to disclose, while women with higher CD4+ counts were significantly more likely to disclose, regardless of relationship type. Relative to all other types of relationships, spouses/romantic partners were greater than four times more likely to be the targets of disclosure. Women were more than 2.5 times more likely to disclose to a given network member if that target provided the woman with social support. Social network members whom women believed to be HIV-positive were more than 10 times more likely to be the targets of disclosure. The implications for how social roles and social identities are manifest in these results are discussed, including the implications such an interpretation has for future prevention research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1253-1261
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Disclosure
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Social network
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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