Direct measurement of conformational strain energy in protofilaments curling outward from disassembling microtubule tips

Jonathan W. Driver, Elisabeth A. Geyer, Megan E. Bailey, Luke M. Rice, Charles L. Asbury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Disassembling microtubules can generate movement independently of motor enzymes, especially at kinetochores where they drive chromosome motility. A popular explanation is the ‘conformational wave’ model, in which protofilaments pull on the kinetochore as they curl outward from a disassembling tip. But whether protofilaments can work efficiently via this spring-like mechanism has been unclear. By modifying a previous assay to use recombinant tubulin and feedback-controlled laser trapping, we directly demonstrate the spring-like elasticity of curling protofilaments. Measuring their mechanical work output suggests they carry ~25% of the energy of GTP hydrolysis as bending strain, enabling them to drive movement with efficiency similar to conventional motors. Surprisingly, a β-tubulin mutant that dramatically slows disassembly has no effect on work output, indicating an uncoupling of disassembly speed from protofilament strain. These results show the wave mechanism can make a major contribution to kinetochore motility and establish a direct approach for measuring tubulin mechano-chemistry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere28433
JournaleLife
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 19 2017

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Kinetochores
Tubulin
Strain energy
Microtubules
Elasticity
Chromosomes
Guanosine Triphosphate
Hydrolysis
Assays
Lasers
Feedback
Enzymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Direct measurement of conformational strain energy in protofilaments curling outward from disassembling microtubule tips. / Driver, Jonathan W.; Geyer, Elisabeth A.; Bailey, Megan E.; Rice, Luke M.; Asbury, Charles L.

In: eLife, Vol. 6, e28433, 19.06.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Driver, Jonathan W. ; Geyer, Elisabeth A. ; Bailey, Megan E. ; Rice, Luke M. ; Asbury, Charles L. / Direct measurement of conformational strain energy in protofilaments curling outward from disassembling microtubule tips. In: eLife. 2017 ; Vol. 6.
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