Disseminated acanthamebiasis in a renal transplant recipient with osteomyelitis and cutaneous lesions

case report and literature review.

Jordan P. Steinberg, Rene L. Galindo, Edward S. Kraus, Khalil G. Ghanem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Disseminated acanthamebiasis is a rare disease that occurs predominantly in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome but also in immunosuppressed transplant recipients. Few reports have focused on non-HIV-infected patients, in whom the disease is more likely to go unsuspected and undiagnosed before death. We describe a renal transplant recipient with Acanthamoeba infection and review the literature. The patient presented with osteomyelitis and widespread cutaneous lesions. No causative organism was identified before death, despite multiple biopsies with detailed histological analysis and culture. Disseminated Acanthamoeba infection was diagnosed after death, when cysts were observed in histological examination of sections of skin from autopsy, and trophozoites were found in retrospectively reviewed skin biopsy and surgical bone specimens. In any immunosuppressed patient, skin and/or bone lesions that fail to show improvement with broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy should raise the suspicion for disseminated acanthamebiasis. Early recognition and treatment may improve clinical outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
Volume35
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2002

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Osteomyelitis
Acanthamoeba
Kidney
Skin
Biopsy
Bone and Bones
Trophozoites
Virus Diseases
Rare Diseases
Infection
Cysts
Autopsy
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
HIV
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Viruses
Transplant Recipients
Therapeutics

Cite this

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