Does local heating-induced nitric oxide production attenuate vasoconstrictor responsiveness to lower body negative pressure in human skin?

David A. Low, Manabu Shibasaki, Scott L. Davis, David M. Keller, Craig G. Crandall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

We tested the hypothesis that local heating-induced nitric oxide (NO) production attenuates cutaneous vasoconstrictor responsiveness. Eleven subjects (6 men, 5 women) had four microdialysis membranes placed in forearm skin. Two membranes were perfused with 10 mM of NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NAME) and two with Ringer solution (control), and all sites were locally heated to 34°C. Subjects then underwent 5 min of 60-mmHg lower body negative pressure (LBNP). Two sites (a control and an L-NAME site) were then heated to 39°C, while the other two sites were heated to 42°C. At the L-NAME sites, skin blood flow was elevated using 0.75-2 mg/ml of adenosine in the perfusate solution (Adn + L-NAME) to a similar level relative to control sites. Subjects then underwent another 5 min of 60-mmHg LBNP. At 34°C, cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) decreased (Δ) similarly at both control and L-NAME sites during LBNP (Δ7.9 ± 3.0 and Δ3.4 ± 0.8% maximum, respectively; P > 0.05). The reduction in CVC to LBNP was also similar between control and Adn + L-NAME sites at 39°C (control Δ11.4 ± 2.5 vs. Adn + L-NAME Δ7.9 ± 2.0% maximum; P > 0.05) and 42°C (control Δ1.9 ± 2.7 vs. Adn + L-NAME Δ 4.2 ± 2.7% maximum; P > 0.05). However, the decrease in CVC at 42°C, regardless of site, was smaller than at 39°C (P < 0.05). These results do not support the hypothesis that local heating-induced NO production attenuates cutaneous vasoconstrictor responsiveness during high levels of LBNP. However, elevated local temperature, per se, attenuates cutaneous vasoconstrictor responsiveness to LBNP, presumably through non-nitric oxide mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1839-1843
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of applied physiology
Volume102
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

Keywords

  • Cutaneous microdialysis
  • Nitric oxide
  • Orthostatic stress
  • Skin blood flow

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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