E-Selectin, Thymus- and Activation-Regulated Chemokine/CCL17, and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Are Constitutively Coexpressed in Dermal Microvessels: A Foundation for a Cutaneous Immunosurveillance System

Benjamin F. Chong, Jo Ellen Murphy, Thomas S. Kupper, Robert C. Fuhlbrigge

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85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The success of the cutaneous immune system reflects its ability to rapidly and efficiently recruit leukocytes to areas of trauma and infection. Skin-homing memory T cells expressing cutaneous lymphocyte-associated Ag tether on the walls of postcapillary venules in inflamed skin via interaction with endothelial E-selectin and roll in response to the shear stress imparted by flowing blood. Rolling cells sample the vascular surface for chemoattractant compounds (e.g., thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL17 interacting with CCR4 on the leukocyte surface) and, if successfully stimulated, progress to firm arrest and transmigration mediated by LFA-1 and vascular ICAM-1. Although it is established that this sequence of events draws T cells into inflamed skin, the mechanisms directing trafficking of T cells to noninflamed skin are less well characterized. We hypothesized that basal expression and colocalization of E-selectin, chemokine (e.g., CCL17), and ICAM-1 in dermal vessels could serve to recruit T cells to noninflamed human skin. Immunohistochemical staining for E-selectin and CD31 demonstrated E-selectin expression in a restricted subset of dermal vessels in noninflamed human skin from three different sites. Confocal multicolor immunofluorescence imaging revealed a nonuniform distribution of E-selectin in dermal vessels as well as colocalization of E-selectin with CCL17 and ICAM-1. Coexpression of these molecules on blood vessels in noninflamed skin provides the basis for a model of cutaneous immunosurveillance system active in the absence of pathologic inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1575-1581
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume172
Issue number3
StatePublished - Feb 1 2004

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Chemokine CCL17
Immunologic Monitoring
E-Selectin
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1
Microvessels
Skin
T-Lymphocytes
Blood Vessels
Leukocytes
Lymphocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1
Venules
Chemotactic Factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

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title = "E-Selectin, Thymus- and Activation-Regulated Chemokine/CCL17, and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Are Constitutively Coexpressed in Dermal Microvessels: A Foundation for a Cutaneous Immunosurveillance System",
abstract = "The success of the cutaneous immune system reflects its ability to rapidly and efficiently recruit leukocytes to areas of trauma and infection. Skin-homing memory T cells expressing cutaneous lymphocyte-associated Ag tether on the walls of postcapillary venules in inflamed skin via interaction with endothelial E-selectin and roll in response to the shear stress imparted by flowing blood. Rolling cells sample the vascular surface for chemoattractant compounds (e.g., thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL17 interacting with CCR4 on the leukocyte surface) and, if successfully stimulated, progress to firm arrest and transmigration mediated by LFA-1 and vascular ICAM-1. Although it is established that this sequence of events draws T cells into inflamed skin, the mechanisms directing trafficking of T cells to noninflamed skin are less well characterized. We hypothesized that basal expression and colocalization of E-selectin, chemokine (e.g., CCL17), and ICAM-1 in dermal vessels could serve to recruit T cells to noninflamed human skin. Immunohistochemical staining for E-selectin and CD31 demonstrated E-selectin expression in a restricted subset of dermal vessels in noninflamed human skin from three different sites. Confocal multicolor immunofluorescence imaging revealed a nonuniform distribution of E-selectin in dermal vessels as well as colocalization of E-selectin with CCL17 and ICAM-1. Coexpression of these molecules on blood vessels in noninflamed skin provides the basis for a model of cutaneous immunosurveillance system active in the absence of pathologic inflammation.",
author = "Chong, {Benjamin F.} and Murphy, {Jo Ellen} and Kupper, {Thomas S.} and Fuhlbrigge, {Robert C.}",
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AU - Chong, Benjamin F.

AU - Murphy, Jo Ellen

AU - Kupper, Thomas S.

AU - Fuhlbrigge, Robert C.

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N2 - The success of the cutaneous immune system reflects its ability to rapidly and efficiently recruit leukocytes to areas of trauma and infection. Skin-homing memory T cells expressing cutaneous lymphocyte-associated Ag tether on the walls of postcapillary venules in inflamed skin via interaction with endothelial E-selectin and roll in response to the shear stress imparted by flowing blood. Rolling cells sample the vascular surface for chemoattractant compounds (e.g., thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL17 interacting with CCR4 on the leukocyte surface) and, if successfully stimulated, progress to firm arrest and transmigration mediated by LFA-1 and vascular ICAM-1. Although it is established that this sequence of events draws T cells into inflamed skin, the mechanisms directing trafficking of T cells to noninflamed skin are less well characterized. We hypothesized that basal expression and colocalization of E-selectin, chemokine (e.g., CCL17), and ICAM-1 in dermal vessels could serve to recruit T cells to noninflamed human skin. Immunohistochemical staining for E-selectin and CD31 demonstrated E-selectin expression in a restricted subset of dermal vessels in noninflamed human skin from three different sites. Confocal multicolor immunofluorescence imaging revealed a nonuniform distribution of E-selectin in dermal vessels as well as colocalization of E-selectin with CCL17 and ICAM-1. Coexpression of these molecules on blood vessels in noninflamed skin provides the basis for a model of cutaneous immunosurveillance system active in the absence of pathologic inflammation.

AB - The success of the cutaneous immune system reflects its ability to rapidly and efficiently recruit leukocytes to areas of trauma and infection. Skin-homing memory T cells expressing cutaneous lymphocyte-associated Ag tether on the walls of postcapillary venules in inflamed skin via interaction with endothelial E-selectin and roll in response to the shear stress imparted by flowing blood. Rolling cells sample the vascular surface for chemoattractant compounds (e.g., thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL17 interacting with CCR4 on the leukocyte surface) and, if successfully stimulated, progress to firm arrest and transmigration mediated by LFA-1 and vascular ICAM-1. Although it is established that this sequence of events draws T cells into inflamed skin, the mechanisms directing trafficking of T cells to noninflamed skin are less well characterized. We hypothesized that basal expression and colocalization of E-selectin, chemokine (e.g., CCL17), and ICAM-1 in dermal vessels could serve to recruit T cells to noninflamed human skin. Immunohistochemical staining for E-selectin and CD31 demonstrated E-selectin expression in a restricted subset of dermal vessels in noninflamed human skin from three different sites. Confocal multicolor immunofluorescence imaging revealed a nonuniform distribution of E-selectin in dermal vessels as well as colocalization of E-selectin with CCL17 and ICAM-1. Coexpression of these molecules on blood vessels in noninflamed skin provides the basis for a model of cutaneous immunosurveillance system active in the absence of pathologic inflammation.

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