Effect of hyperthermia on expression of histocompatibility antigens and heat-shock protein molecules on three human ocular melanoma cell lines

D. J R Blom, I. De Waard-Siebinga, R. S. Apte, G. P M Luyten, J. Y. Niederkorn, M. J. Jager

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hyperthermia is used as a new treatment modality for ocular melanoma. We wondered whether this treatment would affect the antigenicity of melanoma cells and studied the effect of hyperthermia on the expression of histocompatibility antigens (HLA), β2-microglobulin, as well as heat-shock proteins (HSP-60 and HSP-70) on choroidal melanome cells. Uveal melanoma cell lines were exposed to different temperatures (39-45°C) in a waterbath. Antigen expression was determined with fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, using monoclonal antibodies against HLA end HSP. In a 51Cr- release cytotoxicity assay we studied the effect of heat on natural killer (NK) cell susceptibility. Exposure to 45°C for 30 min reduced expression of HLA class I antigens and β2-mi croglobulin. A greater reduction was observed after longer exposure times. Expression of HSP-70 was increased after exposure to 45°C at all time intervals, while expression of HSP-60 was not induced by heat treatment. We did not find a significant difference in the NK cell susceptibility between heated and unheated cells. Hyperthermia has a time- and temperature-dependent effect on expression of HLA class I and HSP- 70 molecules on the cell surface of uveal melanoma cells. Hyperthermia did not alter the susceptibility to NK cell lysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-109
Number of pages7
JournalMelanoma research
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

Keywords

  • HLA molecules
  • HSP molecules
  • NK lysis
  • hyperthermia
  • uveal melanoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Dermatology
  • Cancer Research

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