Effects of mode of exercise recovery on thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses

Robert Carter, Thad E. Wilson, Donald E. Watenpaugh, Michael L. Smith, Craig G. Crandall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To identify the effects of exercise recovery mode on cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and sweat rate, eight healthy adults performed two 15-min bouts of upright cycle ergometry at 60% of maximal heart rate followed by either inactive or active (loadless pedaling) recovery. An index of CVC was calculated from the ratio of laser-Doppler flux to mean arterial pressure. CVC was then expressed as a percentage of maximum (%max) as determined from local heating. At 3 min postexercise, CVC was greater during active recovery (chest: 40 ± 3, forearm: 48 ± 3%max) compared with during inactive recovery (chest: 21 ± 2, forearm: 25 ± 4%max); all P < 0.05. Moreover, at the same time point sweat rate was greater during active recovery (chest: 0.47 ± 0.10, forearm: 0.46 ± 0.10 mg·cm.2·min-1) compared with during inactive recovery (chest: 0.28 ± 0.10, forearm: 0.14 ± 0.20 mg.cm-2·min-1); all P < 0.05. Mean arterial blood pressure, esophageal temperature, and skin temperature were not different between recovery modes. These data suggest that skin blood flow and sweat rate during recovery from exercise may be modulated by nonthermoregulatory mechanisms and that sustained elevations in skin blood flow and sweat rate during mild active recovery may be important for postexertional heat dissipation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1918-1924
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume93
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 2002

Fingerprint

Sweat
Exercise
Forearm
Skin
Blood Vessels
Thorax
Arterial Pressure
Ergometry
Skin Temperature
Heating
Foot
Lasers
Hot Temperature
Heart Rate
Temperature

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Central command
  • Skin blood flow
  • Sweat rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Carter, R., Wilson, T. E., Watenpaugh, D. E., Smith, M. L., & Crandall, C. G. (2002). Effects of mode of exercise recovery on thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses. Journal of Applied Physiology, 93(6), 1918-1924.

Effects of mode of exercise recovery on thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses. / Carter, Robert; Wilson, Thad E.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Smith, Michael L.; Crandall, Craig G.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 93, No. 6, 12.2002, p. 1918-1924.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carter, R, Wilson, TE, Watenpaugh, DE, Smith, ML & Crandall, CG 2002, 'Effects of mode of exercise recovery on thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 93, no. 6, pp. 1918-1924.
Carter, Robert ; Wilson, Thad E. ; Watenpaugh, Donald E. ; Smith, Michael L. ; Crandall, Craig G. / Effects of mode of exercise recovery on thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2002 ; Vol. 93, No. 6. pp. 1918-1924.
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