Energy Absorption Contribution Deficits in Participants Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Implications for Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

Trevor Kovacs, Joseph Hannon, Sharon Wang-Price, Shiho Goto, Jim Bothwell, Steve Singleton, Lindsey Dietrich, J. Craig Garrison, Jack Malafronte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

CONTEXT: Lower-extremity loading patterns change after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). However, there is limited research regarding energy absorption contribution (EAC) of athletes following ACLR who reinjure their ACL and those who do not. EAC can be utilized as a measure of joint loading during tasks. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: Three groups of individuals (13 in each group) with matched age, sex, height, weight, and sports were enrolled. Data were collected at time of return-to-sport testing for the 2 ACLR groups. An 8-camera 3D motion capture system with a sampling rate of 120 Hz and 2 force plates capturing at 1200 Hz were used to capture joint motions in all 3 planes during a double-limb jump landing. RESULTS: Participants in the ACLR no reinjury and ACLR reinjury groups had significantly greater hip EAC (55.8 [21.5] and 56.7 [21.2]) compared with healthy controls (19.5 [11.1]), P < .001 and P < .001, respectively. The ACLR no reinjury and ACLR reinjury groups had significantly lower knee EAC (24.6 [22.7] and 27.4 [20.8]) compared with healthy controls (57.0 [12.2]), P < .001 and P < .001, respectively. However, the ACLR reinjury group had significantly lower ankle EAC (15.9 [4.6]) than healthy controls (23.5 [6.6]), whereas there was no statistical difference between the ACLR no reinjury group (19.7 [7.8]) and healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: Athletes who had a second ACL injury after ACLR, and those without second ACL injury, appear to have similar hip, knee, and ankle joint loading of the surgical limb at return-to-sport testing. Nevertheless, joint loading patterns were significantly different from healthy controls. The study suggests that EAC as a measure of joint loading during a double-limb jump landing at time of return to sport may not be a strong predictor for second injury following ACLR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)911-917
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Sport Rehabilitation
Volume31
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2022

Keywords

  • ACL
  • EAC
  • jump
  • knee
  • rehab

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

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