Epidemiology of nonfatal deliberate self-harm in the United States as described in three medical databases

Cynthia A. Claassen, Madhukar H. Trivedi, Iris Shimizu, Sunita Stewart, Gregory Luke Larkin, Toby Litovitz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

The absence of validated U.S. rates of nonfatal suicidal behavior places risk management and injury prevention programs at danger of being poorly informed and inadequately conceptualized. In this study we compare estimated rates of intentional self-harm from two ongoing surveys (National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program-NEISS-AIP; National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey-NHAMCS) to data from the Toxic Exposure Surveillance System. Results suggest that, for every 2002-2003 suicide, there were 12 (NEISSAIP) or 15 (NHAMCS) self-harm-related emergency department visits, and for every intentional self-poisoning death there were 33 intentional overdoses reported to poison control centers, of which two ultimately went untreated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)192-212
Number of pages21
JournalSuicide and Life-Threatening Behavior
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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