Exploring kinetic energy as a new marker of cardiac function in the single ventricle circulation

James Wong, Radomir Chabiniok, Shane M. Tibby, Kuberan Pushparajah, Eva Sammut, David Celermajer, Daniel Giese, Mohammad T Hussain, Franz G Greil, Tobias Schaeffter, Reza Razavi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ventricular volumetric ejection fraction (VV EF) is often normal in patients with single ventricle circulations despite them experiencing symptoms related to circulatory failure. We sought to determine if kinetic energy (KE) could be a better marker of ventricular performance. KE was prospectively quantified using four-dimensional flow MRI in 41 patients with a single ventricle circulation (aged 0.5–28 yr) and compared with 43 healthy volunteers (aged 1.5– 62 yr) and 14 patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (aged 28 –79 yr). Intraventricular end-diastolic blood was tracked through systole and divided into ejected and residual blood components. Two ejection fraction (EF) metrics were devised based on the KE of the ejected component over the total of both the ejected and residual components using 1) instantaneous peak KE to assess KE EF or 2) summating individual peak particle energy (PE) to assess PE EF. KE EF and PE EF had a smaller range than VV EF in healthy subjects (97.9 0.8 vs. 97.3 0.8 vs. 60.1 5.2%). LV dysfunction caused a fall in KE EF (P 0.01) and PE EF (P 0.0001). VV EF in healthy LVs and single ventricle hearts was equivalent; however, KE EF and PE EF were lower (P 0.001) with a wider range indicating a spectrum of severity. Those reporting the greatest symptomatic impairment (New York Heart Association II) had lower PE EF than asymptomatic subjects (P 0.0067). KE metrics are markers of healthy cardiac function. PE EF may be useful in grading dysfunction. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Kinetic energy (KE) represents the useful work of the heart in ejecting blood. This article details the utilization of KE indexes to assess cardiac function in health and a variety of pathophysiological conditions. KE ejection fraction and particle energy ejection fraction (PE EF) showed a narrow range in health and a lower wider range in disease representing a spectrum of severity. PE EF was altered by functional status potentially offering the opportunity to grade dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)889-900
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume125
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Stroke Volume
Left Ventricular Dysfunction
Healthy Volunteers
Systole
Health
Heart Ventricles
Shock

Keywords

  • Cardiac magnetic resonance
  • Congenital heart disease
  • Heart failure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Wong, J., Chabiniok, R., Tibby, S. M., Pushparajah, K., Sammut, E., Celermajer, D., ... Razavi, R. (2018). Exploring kinetic energy as a new marker of cardiac function in the single ventricle circulation. Journal of Applied Physiology, 125(3), 889-900. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00580.2017

Exploring kinetic energy as a new marker of cardiac function in the single ventricle circulation. / Wong, James; Chabiniok, Radomir; Tibby, Shane M.; Pushparajah, Kuberan; Sammut, Eva; Celermajer, David; Giese, Daniel; Hussain, Mohammad T; Greil, Franz G; Schaeffter, Tobias; Razavi, Reza.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 125, No. 3, 01.01.2018, p. 889-900.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wong, J, Chabiniok, R, Tibby, SM, Pushparajah, K, Sammut, E, Celermajer, D, Giese, D, Hussain, MT, Greil, FG, Schaeffter, T & Razavi, R 2018, 'Exploring kinetic energy as a new marker of cardiac function in the single ventricle circulation', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 125, no. 3, pp. 889-900. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00580.2017
Wong, James ; Chabiniok, Radomir ; Tibby, Shane M. ; Pushparajah, Kuberan ; Sammut, Eva ; Celermajer, David ; Giese, Daniel ; Hussain, Mohammad T ; Greil, Franz G ; Schaeffter, Tobias ; Razavi, Reza. / Exploring kinetic energy as a new marker of cardiac function in the single ventricle circulation. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2018 ; Vol. 125, No. 3. pp. 889-900.
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