Family Discord After Completion of an Outpatient Community Treatment Program Predicts Greater Substance Use During Follow-up

Paul A. Nakonezny, Wayne H. Denton, Arthur N. Westover, Bryon H. Adinoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: It is reasonable to consider family discord after treatment as a potential target for a next-step intervention, since family discord is often comorbid with substance use disorders. Objective: This study evaluated family discord after completing an initial course of treatment as a predictor of substance use and retention in the community treatment program during follow-up. Method: Patients were from two multisite randomized clinical trials implemented through the Clinical Trials Network of the National Institute on Drug Abuse. There were 315 participants from Study 1 (12-week posttreatment follow-up) and 295 participants from Study 2 (8-week posttreatment follow-up). Negative binomial and logistic regression were used to estimate days of substance use and odds of retention in the community treatment program at follow-up, respectively, from family discord status. Results: Family discord was significantly associated with more days of substance use during the posttreatment follow-up period than those without family discord in both Study 1 (9.12 vs. 2.89 days, p =.0001) and Study 2 (5.58 vs. 2.83 days, p =.0062). Family discord was significantly associated with lower retention in the community treatment program at follow-up than those not reporting family discord in Study 1 (47.6% vs. 60.6%; p =.03), but not in Study 2 (55.3% vs. 64.9%; p =.11). Conclusion: Family discord after an initial course of treatment might be a clinically relevant predictor of substance use. There is mixed support for a conclusion that family discord is associated with lower retention in the community treatment program at follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - May 26 2017

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Keywords

  • Family
  • family discord
  • family relations
  • substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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