Fascicular conduction disturbances after coronary artery bypass surgery: A review with a meta-analysis of their long-term significance

Dharam J. Kumbhani, G. V R K Sharma, Shukri F. Khuri, Jamil A. Kirdar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fascicular conduction abnormalities are frequently reported following adult cardiac surgery, but their pathogenesis and long-term outcomes remain unclear. In this article, we review the epidemiological features, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management, and the short-term and long-term significance of fascicular conduction abnormalities following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, based on data from 30 studies. Conduction disturbances have an incidence of 3.4% to 55.8% after CABG surgery, the most common being right bundle branch block (RBBB). RBBB is usually transient and benign. Although a slew of factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of fascicular conduction disturbances, the two most important factors are myocardial ischemia and type of cardioplegia. While a 12-lead electrocardiogram is the gold standard for diagnosis, additional tests such as myocardial enzymes or echocardiography may have additional diagnostic and prognostic value. Short-term prognosis after RBBB is good, but its impact on long-term survival is unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis, the first of its kind in this area, using long-term survival data from five studies. There was no difference in long-term survival between patients who developed conduction disturbances after CABG surgery, and those who did not, indicating a benign influence of conduction disturbances on long-term survival, and the lack of the necessity for monitoring or pacing. While the older literature reported an adverse impact of fascicular conduction disturbances on long-term survival, the more recent studies report a substantially reduced mortality after CABG surgery, despite a higher incidence of conduction disturbances, pointing to the effect of improved surgical techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)428-434
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cardiac Surgery
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006

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Coronary Artery Bypass
Meta-Analysis
Bundle-Branch Block
Survival
Transplants
Induced Heart Arrest
Incidence
Thoracic Surgery
Myocardial Ischemia
Echocardiography
Electrocardiography
Mortality
Enzymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Fascicular conduction disturbances after coronary artery bypass surgery : A review with a meta-analysis of their long-term significance. / Kumbhani, Dharam J.; Sharma, G. V R K; Khuri, Shukri F.; Kirdar, Jamil A.

In: Journal of Cardiac Surgery, Vol. 21, No. 4, 07.2006, p. 428-434.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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