Frontal sinus obliteration: In search of the ideal autogenous material

R. J. Rohrich, T. J. Mickel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The controversies concerning obliteration of the frontal sinus in response to trauma, infection, or tumor growth are long-standing (1913 to the present) and related to the field of training of the surgeon. Successful frontal sinus obliteration requires (1) meticulous removal of the frontal sinus mucosa, (2) removal of the inner cortex of the sinus wall, and (3) permanent occlusion of the nasofrontal duct. It is significant to note that most of the clinical literature relates to management of infected sinuses (sinusitis) and most experimental studies are done on uninfected, unfractured feline models. Therefore, no direct reference can be made to the management of the fractured frontal sinus. The techniques in current use are autologous implantation of fat, bone, and muscle, along with the technique of spontaneous osteogenesis. These techniques are all effective when the preceding guidelines are followed, with the only real advantage being that the spontaneous osteogenesis avoids the problem of donor-site morbidity, which has been as high as 5 percent. This factor makes the osteogenesis technique the method of choice for frontal sinus obliteration. This literature review provides the surgeon with the objective data available for optimal frontal sinus obliteration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)580-585
Number of pages6
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume95
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Frontal Sinusitis
Osteogenesis
Sinusitis
Felidae
Mucous Membrane
Fats
Tissue Donors
Guidelines
Morbidity
Bone and Bones
Muscles
Wounds and Injuries
Growth
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Frontal sinus obliteration : In search of the ideal autogenous material. / Rohrich, R. J.; Mickel, T. J.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 95, No. 3, 1995, p. 580-585.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rohrich, R. J. ; Mickel, T. J. / Frontal sinus obliteration : In search of the ideal autogenous material. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 1995 ; Vol. 95, No. 3. pp. 580-585.
@article{646abb7129dd4e01a9a431b7c997bbe7,
title = "Frontal sinus obliteration: In search of the ideal autogenous material",
abstract = "The controversies concerning obliteration of the frontal sinus in response to trauma, infection, or tumor growth are long-standing (1913 to the present) and related to the field of training of the surgeon. Successful frontal sinus obliteration requires (1) meticulous removal of the frontal sinus mucosa, (2) removal of the inner cortex of the sinus wall, and (3) permanent occlusion of the nasofrontal duct. It is significant to note that most of the clinical literature relates to management of infected sinuses (sinusitis) and most experimental studies are done on uninfected, unfractured feline models. Therefore, no direct reference can be made to the management of the fractured frontal sinus. The techniques in current use are autologous implantation of fat, bone, and muscle, along with the technique of spontaneous osteogenesis. These techniques are all effective when the preceding guidelines are followed, with the only real advantage being that the spontaneous osteogenesis avoids the problem of donor-site morbidity, which has been as high as 5 percent. This factor makes the osteogenesis technique the method of choice for frontal sinus obliteration. This literature review provides the surgeon with the objective data available for optimal frontal sinus obliteration.",
author = "Rohrich, {R. J.} and Mickel, {T. J.}",
year = "1995",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "95",
pages = "580--585",
journal = "Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery",
issn = "0032-1052",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Frontal sinus obliteration

T2 - In search of the ideal autogenous material

AU - Rohrich, R. J.

AU - Mickel, T. J.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - The controversies concerning obliteration of the frontal sinus in response to trauma, infection, or tumor growth are long-standing (1913 to the present) and related to the field of training of the surgeon. Successful frontal sinus obliteration requires (1) meticulous removal of the frontal sinus mucosa, (2) removal of the inner cortex of the sinus wall, and (3) permanent occlusion of the nasofrontal duct. It is significant to note that most of the clinical literature relates to management of infected sinuses (sinusitis) and most experimental studies are done on uninfected, unfractured feline models. Therefore, no direct reference can be made to the management of the fractured frontal sinus. The techniques in current use are autologous implantation of fat, bone, and muscle, along with the technique of spontaneous osteogenesis. These techniques are all effective when the preceding guidelines are followed, with the only real advantage being that the spontaneous osteogenesis avoids the problem of donor-site morbidity, which has been as high as 5 percent. This factor makes the osteogenesis technique the method of choice for frontal sinus obliteration. This literature review provides the surgeon with the objective data available for optimal frontal sinus obliteration.

AB - The controversies concerning obliteration of the frontal sinus in response to trauma, infection, or tumor growth are long-standing (1913 to the present) and related to the field of training of the surgeon. Successful frontal sinus obliteration requires (1) meticulous removal of the frontal sinus mucosa, (2) removal of the inner cortex of the sinus wall, and (3) permanent occlusion of the nasofrontal duct. It is significant to note that most of the clinical literature relates to management of infected sinuses (sinusitis) and most experimental studies are done on uninfected, unfractured feline models. Therefore, no direct reference can be made to the management of the fractured frontal sinus. The techniques in current use are autologous implantation of fat, bone, and muscle, along with the technique of spontaneous osteogenesis. These techniques are all effective when the preceding guidelines are followed, with the only real advantage being that the spontaneous osteogenesis avoids the problem of donor-site morbidity, which has been as high as 5 percent. This factor makes the osteogenesis technique the method of choice for frontal sinus obliteration. This literature review provides the surgeon with the objective data available for optimal frontal sinus obliteration.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028911419&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028911419&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7870788

AN - SCOPUS:0028911419

VL - 95

SP - 580

EP - 585

JO - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

JF - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

SN - 0032-1052

IS - 3

ER -