Functional interrelationships between carbohydrate and lipid storage, and mitochondrial activity during sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Yanjie Liu, N. Ezgi Wood, Ashley J. Marchand, Orlando Arguello-Miranda, Andreas Doncic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In Saccharomyces cerevisiae under conditions of nutrient stress, meiosis precedes the formation of spores. Although the molecular mechanisms that regulate meiosis, such as meiotic recombination and nuclear divisions, have been extensively studied, the metabolic factors that determine the efficiency of sporulation are less understood. Here, we have directly assessed the relationship between metabolic stores and sporulation in S. cerevisiae by genetically disrupting the synthetic pathways for the carbohydrate stores, glycogen (gsy1/2Δ cells), trehalose (tps1Δ cells), or both (gsy1/2Δ and tps1Δ cells). We show that storage carbohydrate-deficient strains are highly inefficient in sporulation. Although glycogen and trehalose stores can partially compensate for each other, they have differential effects on sporulation rate and spore number. Interestingly, deletion of the G1 cyclin, CLN3, which resulted in an increase in cell size, mitochondria and lipid stores, partially rescued meiosis progression and spore ascus formation but not spore number in storage carbohydrate-deficient strains. Sporulation efficiency in the carbohydrate-deficient strain exhibited a greater dependency on mitochondrial activity and lipid stores than wild-type yeast. Taken together, our results provide new insights into the complex crosstalk between metabolic factors that support gametogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-279
Number of pages11
JournalYeast
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2020

Keywords

  • cyclin 3
  • glycogen
  • lipid droplet
  • meiosis
  • trehalose
  • yeast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Biochemistry
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Genetics

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