G protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium channels mediate depotentiation of long-term potentiation

Jung Chung Hee, Woo Ping Ge, Xiang Qian, Ofer Wiser, Nung Jan Yuh, Lily Yeh Jan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

73 Scopus citations

Abstract

Excitatory synapses in the brain undergo activity-dependent changes in the strength of synaptic transmission. Such synaptic plasticity as exemplified by long-term potentiation (LTP) is considered a cellular correlate of learning and memory. The presence of G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K+ (GIRK) channels near excitatory synapses on dendritic spines suggests their possible involvement in synaptic plasticity. However, whether activity-dependent regulation of GIRK channels affects excitatory synaptic plasticity is unknown. In a companion article we have reported activity-dependent regulation of GIRK channel density in cultured hippocampal neurons that requires activity of NMDA receptors (NMDAR) and protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) and takes place within 15 min. In this study, we performed whole-cell recordings of cultured hippocampal neurons and found that NMDAR activation increases basal GIRK current and GIRK channel activation mediated by adenosine A1 receptors, but not GABAB receptors. Given the similar involvement of NMDARs, adenosine A1 receptors, and PP1 in depotentiation of LTP caused by low-frequency stimulation that immediately follows LTP-inducing high-frequency stimulation, we wondered whether NMDAR-induced increase in GIRK channel surface density and current may contribute to the molecular mechanisms underlying this specific depotentiation. Remarkably, GIRK2 null mutation or GIRK channel blockade abolishes depotentiation of LTP, demonstrating that GIRK channels are critical for depotentiation, one form of excitatory synaptic plasticity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)635-640
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume106
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 13 2009

Keywords

  • Adenosine receptor
  • Extracellular field recording
  • Learning and memory
  • Protein phosphatase-1
  • Synaptic plasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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