Giant cell tumor of a lumbar vertebra in a 7-year-old child: A case report

Umesh Metkar, Zabi Wardak, Danielle A. Katz, William F. Lavelle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Design: This case provides a rare occurrence of a giant cell tumor (GCT) in posterior elements of a lumbar vertebra in a 7-year-old child with successful outcome after surgical excision and regular follow-ups. Objective: To present a unique case report of a pediatric GCT in the vertebral column and results. Summary of Background Data: GCT is a rare bone tumor seen in 3% to 5% of primary bone neoplasm. Approximately 7% of GCTs are found in the vertebral column. GCT of the spine is found in only 5% to 7% of cases and can occur in any region of the spine but are believed to be predominantly in the sacrum. Despite its benign nature, expansion in a confined space makes early detection of spinal GCTs important to prevent occurrence of compressive myelopathy/ radiculopathy. The presence of a GCT in a child younger than 10 years of age, in posterior elements of a lumbar vertebral body, has not been reported earlier. Methods: On the basis of the clinical history, radiograph of the thoracolumbar spine, computed tomography of lumbar spine, and magnetic resonance imaging, a preliminary diagnosis of osteoblastoma was made. Results: The patient presented with a lytic lesion with involvement of posterior elements, 1 side the pedicle extending into the body of a lumbar vertebra (L3) and had extension into the paraspinal muscles. Intraoperative exploration and frozen section showed the presence of a typical histologic picture of a GCT. Ipsilateral pedicle, posterior elements, and the superior articular facet were excised. En bloc resection was found not to be feasible due to the friable nature of the tumor and involvement of the soft tissues. In addition, fusion was avoided with consideration of the young age of the patient. Conclusions: The patient has been free of any recurrence as of his last follow-up visit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pediatric Orthopaedics
Volume32
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

Fingerprint

Giant Cell Tumors
Lumbar Vertebrae
Spine
Confined Spaces
Osteoblastoma
Paraspinal Muscles
Sacrum
Bone Neoplasms
Spinal Cord Compression
Radiculopathy
Frozen Sections
Neoplasms
Joints
Tomography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Pediatrics
Bone and Bones
Recurrence

Keywords

  • giant cell
  • lumbar vertebra
  • pediatric
  • tumor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Giant cell tumor of a lumbar vertebra in a 7-year-old child : A case report. / Metkar, Umesh; Wardak, Zabi; Katz, Danielle A.; Lavelle, William F.

In: Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics, Vol. 32, No. 8, 01.12.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Metkar, Umesh ; Wardak, Zabi ; Katz, Danielle A. ; Lavelle, William F. / Giant cell tumor of a lumbar vertebra in a 7-year-old child : A case report. In: Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics. 2012 ; Vol. 32, No. 8.
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