Haemagglutination properties of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis

M. Fitzgerald, S. Murphy, R. Mulcahy, C. Keane, D. Coakley, T. Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability of 30 isolates of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis to haemagglutinate erythrocytes of five species was examined. Two haemagglutination phenotypes of M. catarrhalis were observed: phenotype I isolates (n = 10) agglutinated human erythrocytes, while phenotype II isolates (n = 7) agglutinated both human and rabbit erythrocytes. No haemagglutination was observed with chick, sheep or horse erythrocytes. Haemagglutination by both phenotype I and II isolates was abolished following treatment of these isolates with pronase and trypsin, while heat treatment at 70°C markedly reduced the level of haemagglutination by both sets of isolates. Haemagglutination by phenotype II isolates was inhibited by galactose, whereas haemagglutination by phenotype I isolates was not inhibited by this carbohydrate. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies showed that very close cell-surface interactions occurred when both phenotypes of M. catarrhalis adhered to the human erythrocyte. Fimbrial attachment was not apparent. Haemagglutinating isolates of both phenotppes had a trypsin-sensitive outer fibrillar coat when examined by TEM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-262
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Biomedical Science
Volume53
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 1996

Fingerprint

Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis
Hemagglutination
Trypsin
Transmission electron microscopy
Phenotype
Pronase
Erythrocytes
Galactose
Heat treatment
Carbohydrates
Transmission Electron Microscopy
Cell Communication
Horses
Sheep
Hot Temperature
Rabbits

Keywords

  • Haemagglutination
  • Haemagglutinin
  • Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis
  • Transmission electron microscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Fitzgerald, M., Murphy, S., Mulcahy, R., Keane, C., Coakley, D., & Scott, T. (1996). Haemagglutination properties of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis. British Journal of Biomedical Science, 53(4), 257-262.

Haemagglutination properties of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis. / Fitzgerald, M.; Murphy, S.; Mulcahy, R.; Keane, C.; Coakley, D.; Scott, T.

In: British Journal of Biomedical Science, Vol. 53, No. 4, 01.12.1996, p. 257-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fitzgerald, M, Murphy, S, Mulcahy, R, Keane, C, Coakley, D & Scott, T 1996, 'Haemagglutination properties of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis', British Journal of Biomedical Science, vol. 53, no. 4, pp. 257-262.
Fitzgerald M, Murphy S, Mulcahy R, Keane C, Coakley D, Scott T. Haemagglutination properties of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis. British Journal of Biomedical Science. 1996 Dec 1;53(4):257-262.
Fitzgerald, M. ; Murphy, S. ; Mulcahy, R. ; Keane, C. ; Coakley, D. ; Scott, T. / Haemagglutination properties of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis. In: British Journal of Biomedical Science. 1996 ; Vol. 53, No. 4. pp. 257-262.
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