Health care access and poverty do not explain the higher esophageal cancer mortality in African Americans

Jordan A G Miller, Robert V Rege, Clifford Y. Ko, Edward H. Livingston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Esophageal cancer mortality is increased in African Americans relative to white patients. The reasons for this are unknown but are thought to be related to inadequate access to health care secondary to a higher poverty rate in African American populations. Methods The National Health Interview Survey database for years 1986 to 1994 were combined and linked to the National Death Index. Individuals who died from esophageal carcinoma were assessed in the combined database, thus enabling detailed analysis of their socioeconomic status, race, and health care access. Results Poverty was 4-fold more frequent in African Americans who died from esophageal carcinoma than whites. Despite poverty, African American patients' access to health care was good and was not statistically related to increased mortality. Conclusions Although the esophageal carcinoma mortality rate is higher in African Americans than in whites, it is not clearly related to the presence of poverty or to limited health care access. The higher mortality may be related to lifestyle differences, environmental exposure, or difference in disease biology, but it is not related exclusively to socioeconomic factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-26
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume188
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2004

Fingerprint

Poverty
Esophageal Neoplasms
African Americans
Health Services Accessibility
Delivery of Health Care
Mortality
Carcinoma
Databases
Environmental Exposure
Health Surveys
Social Class
Life Style
Interviews
Population

Keywords

  • African American
  • Epidemiology
  • Esophageal neoplasms
  • Ethnology
  • Health care systems
  • National Death Index
  • National Health Interview Survey
  • Outcomes assessment
  • Poverty
  • Risk factors
  • Social class
  • Socioeconomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Health care access and poverty do not explain the higher esophageal cancer mortality in African Americans. / Miller, Jordan A G; Rege, Robert V; Ko, Clifford Y.; Livingston, Edward H.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 188, No. 1, 07.2004, p. 22-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, Jordan A G ; Rege, Robert V ; Ko, Clifford Y. ; Livingston, Edward H. / Health care access and poverty do not explain the higher esophageal cancer mortality in African Americans. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2004 ; Vol. 188, No. 1. pp. 22-26.
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