Hernia After Pediatric Urological Laparoscopy

Nicholas G. Cost, Joy Lee, Warren T. Snodgrass, Clanton B. Harrison, Duncan T. Wilcox, Linda A. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The incidence of port site hernia following adult laparoscopy is 0.1% to 3.0%. There are no known published reports concerning hernia incidence or related factors after pediatric urological laparoscopic interventions. We present our experience with port site incisional hernias following pediatric urological laparoscopy. Materials and Methods: We reviewed all pediatric urological laparoscopic procedures performed at Children's Medical Center Dallas from 2000 to 2008. A total of 261 cases were identified with followup available in 218 (83.5%). In 187 cases there were sufficient data to evaluate outcomes for each port site separately, and compare the size, location and fascial closure status to hernia development. Results: Median patient age was 6.1 years (range 0.4 to 18.8). A total of 218 patients had a median followup of 5.7 months (range 0.2 to 83.4). Seven hernias (3.2%) were diagnosed at a median of 1.2 months (range 0.1 to 15.1) postoperatively. Patients with hernia were younger than those without hernia, at 1.1 years (range 0.5 to 3.9) vs 6.2 years (0.4 to 18.8, p = 0.04). We analyzed 571 port sites in 187 cases. In 385 ports (67.4%) the fascia was closed. Hernia developed in 4 of 385 ports (1.0%) that were closed and in 3 of 186 (1.6%) that were not closed. No significant relationship was observed between hernia development and port size or location. Conclusions: The incidence of port site hernia after pediatric urological laparoscopy was 3.2%, similar to the reported incidence in adults. While development of hernia after pediatric urological laparoscopy is rare, it is more likely to occur in infants. Due to the low incidence of this complication, it is difficult to draw conclusions regarding contributing factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1163-1167
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume183
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

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Hernia
Laparoscopy
Pediatrics
Incidence
Fascia

Keywords

  • hernia
  • laparoscopy
  • pediatrics
  • urology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Hernia After Pediatric Urological Laparoscopy. / Cost, Nicholas G.; Lee, Joy; Snodgrass, Warren T.; Harrison, Clanton B.; Wilcox, Duncan T.; Baker, Linda A.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 183, No. 3, 03.2010, p. 1163-1167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cost, NG, Lee, J, Snodgrass, WT, Harrison, CB, Wilcox, DT & Baker, LA 2010, 'Hernia After Pediatric Urological Laparoscopy', Journal of Urology, vol. 183, no. 3, pp. 1163-1167. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.juro.2009.11.053
Cost, Nicholas G. ; Lee, Joy ; Snodgrass, Warren T. ; Harrison, Clanton B. ; Wilcox, Duncan T. ; Baker, Linda A. / Hernia After Pediatric Urological Laparoscopy. In: Journal of Urology. 2010 ; Vol. 183, No. 3. pp. 1163-1167.
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abstract = "Purpose: The incidence of port site hernia following adult laparoscopy is 0.1{\%} to 3.0{\%}. There are no known published reports concerning hernia incidence or related factors after pediatric urological laparoscopic interventions. We present our experience with port site incisional hernias following pediatric urological laparoscopy. Materials and Methods: We reviewed all pediatric urological laparoscopic procedures performed at Children's Medical Center Dallas from 2000 to 2008. A total of 261 cases were identified with followup available in 218 (83.5{\%}). In 187 cases there were sufficient data to evaluate outcomes for each port site separately, and compare the size, location and fascial closure status to hernia development. Results: Median patient age was 6.1 years (range 0.4 to 18.8). A total of 218 patients had a median followup of 5.7 months (range 0.2 to 83.4). Seven hernias (3.2{\%}) were diagnosed at a median of 1.2 months (range 0.1 to 15.1) postoperatively. Patients with hernia were younger than those without hernia, at 1.1 years (range 0.5 to 3.9) vs 6.2 years (0.4 to 18.8, p = 0.04). We analyzed 571 port sites in 187 cases. In 385 ports (67.4{\%}) the fascia was closed. Hernia developed in 4 of 385 ports (1.0{\%}) that were closed and in 3 of 186 (1.6{\%}) that were not closed. No significant relationship was observed between hernia development and port size or location. Conclusions: The incidence of port site hernia after pediatric urological laparoscopy was 3.2{\%}, similar to the reported incidence in adults. While development of hernia after pediatric urological laparoscopy is rare, it is more likely to occur in infants. Due to the low incidence of this complication, it is difficult to draw conclusions regarding contributing factors.",
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N2 - Purpose: The incidence of port site hernia following adult laparoscopy is 0.1% to 3.0%. There are no known published reports concerning hernia incidence or related factors after pediatric urological laparoscopic interventions. We present our experience with port site incisional hernias following pediatric urological laparoscopy. Materials and Methods: We reviewed all pediatric urological laparoscopic procedures performed at Children's Medical Center Dallas from 2000 to 2008. A total of 261 cases were identified with followup available in 218 (83.5%). In 187 cases there were sufficient data to evaluate outcomes for each port site separately, and compare the size, location and fascial closure status to hernia development. Results: Median patient age was 6.1 years (range 0.4 to 18.8). A total of 218 patients had a median followup of 5.7 months (range 0.2 to 83.4). Seven hernias (3.2%) were diagnosed at a median of 1.2 months (range 0.1 to 15.1) postoperatively. Patients with hernia were younger than those without hernia, at 1.1 years (range 0.5 to 3.9) vs 6.2 years (0.4 to 18.8, p = 0.04). We analyzed 571 port sites in 187 cases. In 385 ports (67.4%) the fascia was closed. Hernia developed in 4 of 385 ports (1.0%) that were closed and in 3 of 186 (1.6%) that were not closed. No significant relationship was observed between hernia development and port size or location. Conclusions: The incidence of port site hernia after pediatric urological laparoscopy was 3.2%, similar to the reported incidence in adults. While development of hernia after pediatric urological laparoscopy is rare, it is more likely to occur in infants. Due to the low incidence of this complication, it is difficult to draw conclusions regarding contributing factors.

AB - Purpose: The incidence of port site hernia following adult laparoscopy is 0.1% to 3.0%. There are no known published reports concerning hernia incidence or related factors after pediatric urological laparoscopic interventions. We present our experience with port site incisional hernias following pediatric urological laparoscopy. Materials and Methods: We reviewed all pediatric urological laparoscopic procedures performed at Children's Medical Center Dallas from 2000 to 2008. A total of 261 cases were identified with followup available in 218 (83.5%). In 187 cases there were sufficient data to evaluate outcomes for each port site separately, and compare the size, location and fascial closure status to hernia development. Results: Median patient age was 6.1 years (range 0.4 to 18.8). A total of 218 patients had a median followup of 5.7 months (range 0.2 to 83.4). Seven hernias (3.2%) were diagnosed at a median of 1.2 months (range 0.1 to 15.1) postoperatively. Patients with hernia were younger than those without hernia, at 1.1 years (range 0.5 to 3.9) vs 6.2 years (0.4 to 18.8, p = 0.04). We analyzed 571 port sites in 187 cases. In 385 ports (67.4%) the fascia was closed. Hernia developed in 4 of 385 ports (1.0%) that were closed and in 3 of 186 (1.6%) that were not closed. No significant relationship was observed between hernia development and port size or location. Conclusions: The incidence of port site hernia after pediatric urological laparoscopy was 3.2%, similar to the reported incidence in adults. While development of hernia after pediatric urological laparoscopy is rare, it is more likely to occur in infants. Due to the low incidence of this complication, it is difficult to draw conclusions regarding contributing factors.

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