Home-Based Parent-Child Therapy in Low-Income African American, Caucasian, and Latino Families: A Comparative Examination of Treatment Outcomes

Brittany L. Gresl, Robert A. Fox, Alicia Fleischmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined parent and child treatment outcomes for a home-based Parent-Child Therapy (PCT) program for 66 children from families living in poverty. African American, Caucasian, and Latino families were examined to determine if an evidence-based program would produce similar results across different ethnic groups. The results showed that caregivers across the three ethnic groups reported improved child challenging behavior, increased positive parent-child interactions, improved parental expectations, higher levels of nurturing, and less reliance on verbal and corporal punishment as a form of discipline. Practical implications for these results are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-50
Number of pages18
JournalChild and Family Behavior Therapy
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Caucasian
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
parents
low income
examination
Ethnic Groups
ethnic group
Punishment
Child Behavior
Therapeutics
Poverty
Caregivers
caregiver
penalty
American
poverty
interaction
evidence

Keywords

  • african american
  • behavior problems
  • caucasian
  • home-based
  • latino
  • parent-child therapy
  • poverty
  • young children

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Home-Based Parent-Child Therapy in Low-Income African American, Caucasian, and Latino Families : A Comparative Examination of Treatment Outcomes. / Gresl, Brittany L.; Fox, Robert A.; Fleischmann, Alicia.

In: Child and Family Behavior Therapy, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 33-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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