Hypoventilation after high unilateral cervical chordotomy in a patient with preexisting injury of the phrenic nerve

G. E. Hill, S. L. Polk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cervical chordotomy was first recommended over 60 years ago as treatment for chronic pain in the upper extremity and neck. Peet and colleagues cautioned against bilateral cervical chordotomy because of the high incidence of postoperative respiratory paralysis. Since that time many authors have reported significant morbidity and mortality after bilateral cervical chordotomy. More recently, unilateral cervical chordotomy also has caused postoperative respiratory dysfunction. A spectrum of postoperative difficulties have been reported by Krieger and Rosomoff which include intraoperative vasomotor disturbances (hypotension and bradycardia) and subsequent postural hypotension, intraoperative apnea and postoperatively diminished tidal volumes and vital capacity, postoperative urinary retention, postoperative complaints of lethargy, depression, and asthenia, irregular respiratory pattern and/or apnea with sleep, and electrolyte disturbances, particularly hyponatremia. The authors have recently encountered many of these problems in a patient who had preexisting injury of the left phrenic nerve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)718
Number of pages1
JournalSouthern Medical Journal
Volume69
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1976

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Cordotomy
Hypoventilation
Phrenic Nerve
Wounds and Injuries
Respiratory Paralysis
Asthenia
Lethargy
Orthostatic Hypotension
Urinary Retention
Hyponatremia
Tidal Volume
Vital Capacity
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Apnea
Bradycardia
Upper Extremity
Chronic Pain
Hypotension
Electrolytes
Neck

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Hypoventilation after high unilateral cervical chordotomy in a patient with preexisting injury of the phrenic nerve. / Hill, G. E.; Polk, S. L.

In: Southern Medical Journal, Vol. 69, No. 6, 1976, p. 718.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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