Immunology: TLR11 activation of dendritic cells by a protozoan profilin-like protein

Felix Yarovinsky, Dekai Zhang, John F. Andersen, Gerard L. Bannenberg, Charles N. Serhan, Matthew S. Hayden, Sara Hieny, Fayyaz S. Sutterwala, Richard A. Flavell, Sankar Ghosh, Alan Sher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

684 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in the innate recognition of pathogens by dendritic cells (DCs). Although TLRs are clearly involved in the detection of bacteria and viruses, relatively little is known about their function in the innate response to eukaryotic microorganisms. Here we identify a profilin-like molecule from the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii that generates a potent interleukin-12 (IL-12) response in murine DCs that is dependent on myeloid differentiation factor 88. T. gondii profilin activates DCs through TLR11 and is the first chemically defined ligand for this TLR. Moreover, TLR11 is required in vivo for parasite-induced IL-12 production and optimal resistance to infection, thereby establishing a role for the receptor in host recognition of protozoan pathogens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1626-1629
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume308
Issue number5728
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 10 2005

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Protozoan Proteins
Profilins
Toll-Like Receptors
Allergy and Immunology
Dendritic Cells
Toxoplasma
Interleukin-12
Parasites
Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88
Ligands
Viruses
Bacteria
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Yarovinsky, F., Zhang, D., Andersen, J. F., Bannenberg, G. L., Serhan, C. N., Hayden, M. S., ... Sher, A. (2005). Immunology: TLR11 activation of dendritic cells by a protozoan profilin-like protein. Science, 308(5728), 1626-1629. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1109893

Immunology : TLR11 activation of dendritic cells by a protozoan profilin-like protein. / Yarovinsky, Felix; Zhang, Dekai; Andersen, John F.; Bannenberg, Gerard L.; Serhan, Charles N.; Hayden, Matthew S.; Hieny, Sara; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.; Flavell, Richard A.; Ghosh, Sankar; Sher, Alan.

In: Science, Vol. 308, No. 5728, 10.06.2005, p. 1626-1629.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yarovinsky, F, Zhang, D, Andersen, JF, Bannenberg, GL, Serhan, CN, Hayden, MS, Hieny, S, Sutterwala, FS, Flavell, RA, Ghosh, S & Sher, A 2005, 'Immunology: TLR11 activation of dendritic cells by a protozoan profilin-like protein', Science, vol. 308, no. 5728, pp. 1626-1629. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1109893
Yarovinsky F, Zhang D, Andersen JF, Bannenberg GL, Serhan CN, Hayden MS et al. Immunology: TLR11 activation of dendritic cells by a protozoan profilin-like protein. Science. 2005 Jun 10;308(5728):1626-1629. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1109893
Yarovinsky, Felix ; Zhang, Dekai ; Andersen, John F. ; Bannenberg, Gerard L. ; Serhan, Charles N. ; Hayden, Matthew S. ; Hieny, Sara ; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S. ; Flavell, Richard A. ; Ghosh, Sankar ; Sher, Alan. / Immunology : TLR11 activation of dendritic cells by a protozoan profilin-like protein. In: Science. 2005 ; Vol. 308, No. 5728. pp. 1626-1629.
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