Impact of crossing technique on the incidence of periprocedural myocardial infarction during chronic total occlusion percutaneous coronary intervention

Jeffrey Stetler, Aris Karatasakis, Georgios E. Christakopoulos, Muhammad Nauman J. Tarar, Suwetha Amsavelu, Krishna Patel, Bavana V. Rangan, Michele Roesle, Erica Resendes, Jerrold Grodin, Shuaib Abdullah, Subhash Banerjee, Emmanouil S. Brilakis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: We sought to evaluate the impact of crossing strategy on the incidence of periprocedural myocardial infarction (PMI) during chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Background: The optimal technique for crossing coronary CTOs remains controversial. Methods: We retrospectively examined the incidence of PMI among 184 consecutive patients who underwent CTO PCI at our institution between 2012 and 2015. Creatine kinase-myocardial band fraction (CK-MB) and troponin were measured before and after PCI in all patients. PMI was defined as CK-MB increase ≥3× upper limit of normal (ULN). Results: Mean age was 65 ± 8 years, 98% of patients were men, 57% had diabetes mellitus, 36% were current smokers, 38% had prior heart failure, 31% had prior coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), and 55% had prior PCI. The retrograde approach was used in 38% of cases. As compared with antegrade wire escalation and antegrade dissection/re-entry, use of the retrograde approach was associated with higher J-CTO (Multicenter CTO Registry of Japan) scores (P < 0.0001), higher frequency of moderate or severe calcification (P = 0.0061), longer CTO length (P < 0.0001), more frequent proximal cap ambiguity (P < 0.0001), and lower technical (P = 0.0007) and procedural (P = 0.0014) success. The frequency of PMI for the antegrade-only and retrograde cases was 10% and 33%, respectively (P = 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, use of the retrograde approach and moderate/severe calcification were independently associated with higher incidence of PMI. Conclusions: As compared with antegrade-only crossing techniques, the retrograde approach is used in patients with more complex anatomy but may carry higher risk for PMI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalCatheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Myocardial Infarction
Incidence
MB Form Creatine Kinase
Troponin
Coronary Artery Bypass
Registries
Dissection
Anatomy
Diabetes Mellitus
Japan
Multivariate Analysis
Heart Failure
Transplants

Keywords

  • chronic total occlusion
  • percutaneous coronary intervention
  • periprocedural myocardial infarction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Impact of crossing technique on the incidence of periprocedural myocardial infarction during chronic total occlusion percutaneous coronary intervention. / Stetler, Jeffrey; Karatasakis, Aris; Christakopoulos, Georgios E.; Tarar, Muhammad Nauman J.; Amsavelu, Suwetha; Patel, Krishna; Rangan, Bavana V.; Roesle, Michele; Resendes, Erica; Grodin, Jerrold; Abdullah, Shuaib; Banerjee, Subhash; Brilakis, Emmanouil S.

In: Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, Vol. 88, No. 1, 01.07.2016, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stetler, Jeffrey ; Karatasakis, Aris ; Christakopoulos, Georgios E. ; Tarar, Muhammad Nauman J. ; Amsavelu, Suwetha ; Patel, Krishna ; Rangan, Bavana V. ; Roesle, Michele ; Resendes, Erica ; Grodin, Jerrold ; Abdullah, Shuaib ; Banerjee, Subhash ; Brilakis, Emmanouil S. / Impact of crossing technique on the incidence of periprocedural myocardial infarction during chronic total occlusion percutaneous coronary intervention. In: Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions. 2016 ; Vol. 88, No. 1. pp. 1-6.
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abstract = "Objectives: We sought to evaluate the impact of crossing strategy on the incidence of periprocedural myocardial infarction (PMI) during chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Background: The optimal technique for crossing coronary CTOs remains controversial. Methods: We retrospectively examined the incidence of PMI among 184 consecutive patients who underwent CTO PCI at our institution between 2012 and 2015. Creatine kinase-myocardial band fraction (CK-MB) and troponin were measured before and after PCI in all patients. PMI was defined as CK-MB increase ≥3× upper limit of normal (ULN). Results: Mean age was 65 ± 8 years, 98{\%} of patients were men, 57{\%} had diabetes mellitus, 36{\%} were current smokers, 38{\%} had prior heart failure, 31{\%} had prior coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), and 55{\%} had prior PCI. The retrograde approach was used in 38{\%} of cases. As compared with antegrade wire escalation and antegrade dissection/re-entry, use of the retrograde approach was associated with higher J-CTO (Multicenter CTO Registry of Japan) scores (P < 0.0001), higher frequency of moderate or severe calcification (P = 0.0061), longer CTO length (P < 0.0001), more frequent proximal cap ambiguity (P < 0.0001), and lower technical (P = 0.0007) and procedural (P = 0.0014) success. The frequency of PMI for the antegrade-only and retrograde cases was 10{\%} and 33{\%}, respectively (P = 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, use of the retrograde approach and moderate/severe calcification were independently associated with higher incidence of PMI. Conclusions: As compared with antegrade-only crossing techniques, the retrograde approach is used in patients with more complex anatomy but may carry higher risk for PMI.",
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T1 - Impact of crossing technique on the incidence of periprocedural myocardial infarction during chronic total occlusion percutaneous coronary intervention

AU - Stetler, Jeffrey

AU - Karatasakis, Aris

AU - Christakopoulos, Georgios E.

AU - Tarar, Muhammad Nauman J.

AU - Amsavelu, Suwetha

AU - Patel, Krishna

AU - Rangan, Bavana V.

AU - Roesle, Michele

AU - Resendes, Erica

AU - Grodin, Jerrold

AU - Abdullah, Shuaib

AU - Banerjee, Subhash

AU - Brilakis, Emmanouil S.

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N2 - Objectives: We sought to evaluate the impact of crossing strategy on the incidence of periprocedural myocardial infarction (PMI) during chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Background: The optimal technique for crossing coronary CTOs remains controversial. Methods: We retrospectively examined the incidence of PMI among 184 consecutive patients who underwent CTO PCI at our institution between 2012 and 2015. Creatine kinase-myocardial band fraction (CK-MB) and troponin were measured before and after PCI in all patients. PMI was defined as CK-MB increase ≥3× upper limit of normal (ULN). Results: Mean age was 65 ± 8 years, 98% of patients were men, 57% had diabetes mellitus, 36% were current smokers, 38% had prior heart failure, 31% had prior coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), and 55% had prior PCI. The retrograde approach was used in 38% of cases. As compared with antegrade wire escalation and antegrade dissection/re-entry, use of the retrograde approach was associated with higher J-CTO (Multicenter CTO Registry of Japan) scores (P < 0.0001), higher frequency of moderate or severe calcification (P = 0.0061), longer CTO length (P < 0.0001), more frequent proximal cap ambiguity (P < 0.0001), and lower technical (P = 0.0007) and procedural (P = 0.0014) success. The frequency of PMI for the antegrade-only and retrograde cases was 10% and 33%, respectively (P = 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, use of the retrograde approach and moderate/severe calcification were independently associated with higher incidence of PMI. Conclusions: As compared with antegrade-only crossing techniques, the retrograde approach is used in patients with more complex anatomy but may carry higher risk for PMI.

AB - Objectives: We sought to evaluate the impact of crossing strategy on the incidence of periprocedural myocardial infarction (PMI) during chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Background: The optimal technique for crossing coronary CTOs remains controversial. Methods: We retrospectively examined the incidence of PMI among 184 consecutive patients who underwent CTO PCI at our institution between 2012 and 2015. Creatine kinase-myocardial band fraction (CK-MB) and troponin were measured before and after PCI in all patients. PMI was defined as CK-MB increase ≥3× upper limit of normal (ULN). Results: Mean age was 65 ± 8 years, 98% of patients were men, 57% had diabetes mellitus, 36% were current smokers, 38% had prior heart failure, 31% had prior coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), and 55% had prior PCI. The retrograde approach was used in 38% of cases. As compared with antegrade wire escalation and antegrade dissection/re-entry, use of the retrograde approach was associated with higher J-CTO (Multicenter CTO Registry of Japan) scores (P < 0.0001), higher frequency of moderate or severe calcification (P = 0.0061), longer CTO length (P < 0.0001), more frequent proximal cap ambiguity (P < 0.0001), and lower technical (P = 0.0007) and procedural (P = 0.0014) success. The frequency of PMI for the antegrade-only and retrograde cases was 10% and 33%, respectively (P = 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, use of the retrograde approach and moderate/severe calcification were independently associated with higher incidence of PMI. Conclusions: As compared with antegrade-only crossing techniques, the retrograde approach is used in patients with more complex anatomy but may carry higher risk for PMI.

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