Improving resident performance on standardized assessments of medical knowledge: A retrospective analysis of interventions correlated to American Board of Surgery In-Service Training Examination performance

Elaine Jayne Buckley, Stephen Markwell, Debb Farr, Hilary Sanfey, John Mellinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background American Board of Surgery In-Service Training Examination (ABSITE) scores are used to assess individual progress and predict board pass rates. We reviewed strategies to enhance ABSITE performance and their impact within a surgery residency. Methods Several interventions were introduced from 2010 to 2014. A retrospective review was undertaken evaluating these and correlating them to ABSITE performance. Analyses of variance and linear trends were performed for ABSITE, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLEs), mock oral, and mock ABSITE scores followed by post hoc analyses if significant. Results were correlated with core curricular changes. Results ABSITE mean percentile increased 34% in 4 years with significant performance improvement and increasing linear trends in postgraduate year (PGY)1 and PGY4 ABSITE scores. Mock ABSITE introduction correlated to significant improvement in ABSITE scores for PGY4 and PGY5. Mock oral introduction correlated with significant improvement in PGY1 and PGY3. Conclusions Our study demonstrates an improvement in mean program ABSITE percentiles correlating with multiple interventions. Similar strategies may be useful for other programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)734-738
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume210
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

Keywords

  • ABS qualifying exam
  • ABSITE performance
  • Core curriculum
  • General surgery residency
  • USMLE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Improving resident performance on standardized assessments of medical knowledge: A retrospective analysis of interventions correlated to American Board of Surgery In-Service Training Examination performance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this