Incidence of new atherothrombotic brain infarction in older persons with prior myocardial infarction and serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥ 125 mg/dl treated with statins versus no lipid-lowering drug

Wilbert S. Aronow, Chul Ahn, Hal Gutstein

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Abstract

Background. We report the incidence of new atherothrombotic brain infarction (ABI) in older men and women with prior myocardial infarction and a serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol of ≥ 125 mg/dl treated with statins and with no lipid-lowering drug. Methods. The incidence of new ABI was investigated in an observational prospective study of 1410 men and women, mean age 81 ± 9 years, with prior myocardial infarction and a serum LDL cholesterol of ≥ 125 mg/dl treated with statins (679 persons or 48%) and with no lipid-lowering drug (731 persons or 52%). Follow-up was 36 ± 21 months. Results. At follow-up, the stepwise Cox regression model showed that significant independent predictors of new ABI were age (risk ratio = 1.04 for a 1-year increase in age), cigarette smoking (risk ratio = 3.5), hypertension (risk ratio = 3.1), diabetes mellitus (risk ratio = 2.3), initial serum LDL cholesterol (risk ratio = 1.01 for each 1 mg/dl increase), initial serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (risk ratio = 0.97 for each 1 mg/dl increase), prior stroke (risk ratio = 2.5), and use of statins (risk ratio = 0.40). The Cochran-Armitage test showed a trend in the reduction of new ABI in persons treated with statins as the level of serum LDL cholesterol decreased (p < .0001). Conclusions. Use of statins caused a 60%, significant, independent reduction in new ABI in older men and women with prior myocardial infarction and a serum LDL cholesterol of ≥ 125 mg/dl.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume57
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2002

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Brain Infarction
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
LDL Cholesterol
Odds Ratio
Myocardial Infarction
Lipids
Incidence
Serum
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Proportional Hazards Models
HDL Cholesterol
Observational Studies
Diabetes Mellitus
Smoking
Stroke
Prospective Studies
Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging

Cite this

@article{455bd730aef54d38b0854629e5cb8564,
title = "Incidence of new atherothrombotic brain infarction in older persons with prior myocardial infarction and serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥ 125 mg/dl treated with statins versus no lipid-lowering drug",
abstract = "Background. We report the incidence of new atherothrombotic brain infarction (ABI) in older men and women with prior myocardial infarction and a serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol of ≥ 125 mg/dl treated with statins and with no lipid-lowering drug. Methods. The incidence of new ABI was investigated in an observational prospective study of 1410 men and women, mean age 81 ± 9 years, with prior myocardial infarction and a serum LDL cholesterol of ≥ 125 mg/dl treated with statins (679 persons or 48{\%}) and with no lipid-lowering drug (731 persons or 52{\%}). Follow-up was 36 ± 21 months. Results. At follow-up, the stepwise Cox regression model showed that significant independent predictors of new ABI were age (risk ratio = 1.04 for a 1-year increase in age), cigarette smoking (risk ratio = 3.5), hypertension (risk ratio = 3.1), diabetes mellitus (risk ratio = 2.3), initial serum LDL cholesterol (risk ratio = 1.01 for each 1 mg/dl increase), initial serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (risk ratio = 0.97 for each 1 mg/dl increase), prior stroke (risk ratio = 2.5), and use of statins (risk ratio = 0.40). The Cochran-Armitage test showed a trend in the reduction of new ABI in persons treated with statins as the level of serum LDL cholesterol decreased (p < .0001). Conclusions. Use of statins caused a 60{\%}, significant, independent reduction in new ABI in older men and women with prior myocardial infarction and a serum LDL cholesterol of ≥ 125 mg/dl.",
author = "Aronow, {Wilbert S.} and Chul Ahn and Hal Gutstein",
year = "2002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "57",
journal = "Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences",
issn = "1079-5006",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "5",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Incidence of new atherothrombotic brain infarction in older persons with prior myocardial infarction and serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥ 125 mg/dl treated with statins versus no lipid-lowering drug

AU - Aronow, Wilbert S.

AU - Ahn, Chul

AU - Gutstein, Hal

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Background. We report the incidence of new atherothrombotic brain infarction (ABI) in older men and women with prior myocardial infarction and a serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol of ≥ 125 mg/dl treated with statins and with no lipid-lowering drug. Methods. The incidence of new ABI was investigated in an observational prospective study of 1410 men and women, mean age 81 ± 9 years, with prior myocardial infarction and a serum LDL cholesterol of ≥ 125 mg/dl treated with statins (679 persons or 48%) and with no lipid-lowering drug (731 persons or 52%). Follow-up was 36 ± 21 months. Results. At follow-up, the stepwise Cox regression model showed that significant independent predictors of new ABI were age (risk ratio = 1.04 for a 1-year increase in age), cigarette smoking (risk ratio = 3.5), hypertension (risk ratio = 3.1), diabetes mellitus (risk ratio = 2.3), initial serum LDL cholesterol (risk ratio = 1.01 for each 1 mg/dl increase), initial serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (risk ratio = 0.97 for each 1 mg/dl increase), prior stroke (risk ratio = 2.5), and use of statins (risk ratio = 0.40). The Cochran-Armitage test showed a trend in the reduction of new ABI in persons treated with statins as the level of serum LDL cholesterol decreased (p < .0001). Conclusions. Use of statins caused a 60%, significant, independent reduction in new ABI in older men and women with prior myocardial infarction and a serum LDL cholesterol of ≥ 125 mg/dl.

AB - Background. We report the incidence of new atherothrombotic brain infarction (ABI) in older men and women with prior myocardial infarction and a serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol of ≥ 125 mg/dl treated with statins and with no lipid-lowering drug. Methods. The incidence of new ABI was investigated in an observational prospective study of 1410 men and women, mean age 81 ± 9 years, with prior myocardial infarction and a serum LDL cholesterol of ≥ 125 mg/dl treated with statins (679 persons or 48%) and with no lipid-lowering drug (731 persons or 52%). Follow-up was 36 ± 21 months. Results. At follow-up, the stepwise Cox regression model showed that significant independent predictors of new ABI were age (risk ratio = 1.04 for a 1-year increase in age), cigarette smoking (risk ratio = 3.5), hypertension (risk ratio = 3.1), diabetes mellitus (risk ratio = 2.3), initial serum LDL cholesterol (risk ratio = 1.01 for each 1 mg/dl increase), initial serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (risk ratio = 0.97 for each 1 mg/dl increase), prior stroke (risk ratio = 2.5), and use of statins (risk ratio = 0.40). The Cochran-Armitage test showed a trend in the reduction of new ABI in persons treated with statins as the level of serum LDL cholesterol decreased (p < .0001). Conclusions. Use of statins caused a 60%, significant, independent reduction in new ABI in older men and women with prior myocardial infarction and a serum LDL cholesterol of ≥ 125 mg/dl.

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