Incidence, predictors, and outcomes of hospital-acquired anemia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Although hypothesized to be a hazard of hospitalization, it is unclear whether hospital-acquired anemia (HAA) is associated with increased adverse outcomes following discharge. OBJECTIVE: To examine the incidence, predictors, and postdischarge outcomes associated with HAA. DESIGN: Observational cohort study using electronic health record data. SUBJECTS: Consecutive medicine discharges between November 1, 2009 and October 30, 2010 from 6 Texas hospitals, including safety-net, teaching, and nonteaching sites. Patients with anemia on admission or missing hematocrit values at admission or discharge were excluded. MEASURES: HAA was defined using the last hematocrit value prior to discharge and categorized by severity. The primary outcome was a composite of 30-day mortality and nonelective readmission. RESULTS: Among 11,309 patients, one-third developed HAA (21.6% with mild HAA; 10.1% with moderate HAA; and 1.4% with severe HAA). The 2 strongest potentially modifiable predictors of developing moderate or severe HAA were length of stay (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.26 per day; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-1.29) and receipt of a major procedure (adjusted OR, 5.09; 95% CI, 3.79-6.82). Patients without HAA had a 9.7% incidence for the composite outcome versus 16.4% for those with severe HAA. Severe HAA was independently associated with a 39% increase in the odds for 30-day readmission or death (95% CI, 1.09-1.78). Most patients with severe HAA (85%) underwent a major procedure, had a discharge diagnosis of hemorrhage, and/or a discharge diagnosis of hemorrhagic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Severe HAA is associated with increased odds for 30-day mortality and readmission after discharge; however, it is uncertain whether severe HAA is preventable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-322
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Hospital Medicine
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Fingerprint

Anemia
Incidence
Confidence Intervals
Hematocrit
Safety-net Providers
Odds Ratio
Hemorrhagic Disorders
Mortality
Electronic Health Records
Observational Studies
Length of Stay
Teaching
Hospitalization
Cohort Studies
Medicine
Hemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Fundamentals and skills
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning
  • Assessment and Diagnosis

Cite this

Incidence, predictors, and outcomes of hospital-acquired anemia. / Makam, Anil N.; Nguyen, Oanh K.; Clark, Christopher; Halm, Ethan A.

In: Journal of Hospital Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 5, 01.05.2017, p. 317-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Although hypothesized to be a hazard of hospitalization, it is unclear whether hospital-acquired anemia (HAA) is associated with increased adverse outcomes following discharge. OBJECTIVE: To examine the incidence, predictors, and postdischarge outcomes associated with HAA. DESIGN: Observational cohort study using electronic health record data. SUBJECTS: Consecutive medicine discharges between November 1, 2009 and October 30, 2010 from 6 Texas hospitals, including safety-net, teaching, and nonteaching sites. Patients with anemia on admission or missing hematocrit values at admission or discharge were excluded. MEASURES: HAA was defined using the last hematocrit value prior to discharge and categorized by severity. The primary outcome was a composite of 30-day mortality and nonelective readmission. RESULTS: Among 11,309 patients, one-third developed HAA (21.6{\%} with mild HAA; 10.1{\%} with moderate HAA; and 1.4{\%} with severe HAA). The 2 strongest potentially modifiable predictors of developing moderate or severe HAA were length of stay (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.26 per day; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.23-1.29) and receipt of a major procedure (adjusted OR, 5.09; 95{\%} CI, 3.79-6.82). Patients without HAA had a 9.7{\%} incidence for the composite outcome versus 16.4{\%} for those with severe HAA. Severe HAA was independently associated with a 39{\%} increase in the odds for 30-day readmission or death (95{\%} CI, 1.09-1.78). Most patients with severe HAA (85{\%}) underwent a major procedure, had a discharge diagnosis of hemorrhage, and/or a discharge diagnosis of hemorrhagic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Severe HAA is associated with increased odds for 30-day mortality and readmission after discharge; however, it is uncertain whether severe HAA is preventable.",
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AU - Halm, Ethan A.

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Although hypothesized to be a hazard of hospitalization, it is unclear whether hospital-acquired anemia (HAA) is associated with increased adverse outcomes following discharge. OBJECTIVE: To examine the incidence, predictors, and postdischarge outcomes associated with HAA. DESIGN: Observational cohort study using electronic health record data. SUBJECTS: Consecutive medicine discharges between November 1, 2009 and October 30, 2010 from 6 Texas hospitals, including safety-net, teaching, and nonteaching sites. Patients with anemia on admission or missing hematocrit values at admission or discharge were excluded. MEASURES: HAA was defined using the last hematocrit value prior to discharge and categorized by severity. The primary outcome was a composite of 30-day mortality and nonelective readmission. RESULTS: Among 11,309 patients, one-third developed HAA (21.6% with mild HAA; 10.1% with moderate HAA; and 1.4% with severe HAA). The 2 strongest potentially modifiable predictors of developing moderate or severe HAA were length of stay (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.26 per day; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-1.29) and receipt of a major procedure (adjusted OR, 5.09; 95% CI, 3.79-6.82). Patients without HAA had a 9.7% incidence for the composite outcome versus 16.4% for those with severe HAA. Severe HAA was independently associated with a 39% increase in the odds for 30-day readmission or death (95% CI, 1.09-1.78). Most patients with severe HAA (85%) underwent a major procedure, had a discharge diagnosis of hemorrhage, and/or a discharge diagnosis of hemorrhagic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Severe HAA is associated with increased odds for 30-day mortality and readmission after discharge; however, it is uncertain whether severe HAA is preventable.

AB - BACKGROUND: Although hypothesized to be a hazard of hospitalization, it is unclear whether hospital-acquired anemia (HAA) is associated with increased adverse outcomes following discharge. OBJECTIVE: To examine the incidence, predictors, and postdischarge outcomes associated with HAA. DESIGN: Observational cohort study using electronic health record data. SUBJECTS: Consecutive medicine discharges between November 1, 2009 and October 30, 2010 from 6 Texas hospitals, including safety-net, teaching, and nonteaching sites. Patients with anemia on admission or missing hematocrit values at admission or discharge were excluded. MEASURES: HAA was defined using the last hematocrit value prior to discharge and categorized by severity. The primary outcome was a composite of 30-day mortality and nonelective readmission. RESULTS: Among 11,309 patients, one-third developed HAA (21.6% with mild HAA; 10.1% with moderate HAA; and 1.4% with severe HAA). The 2 strongest potentially modifiable predictors of developing moderate or severe HAA were length of stay (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.26 per day; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-1.29) and receipt of a major procedure (adjusted OR, 5.09; 95% CI, 3.79-6.82). Patients without HAA had a 9.7% incidence for the composite outcome versus 16.4% for those with severe HAA. Severe HAA was independently associated with a 39% increase in the odds for 30-day readmission or death (95% CI, 1.09-1.78). Most patients with severe HAA (85%) underwent a major procedure, had a discharge diagnosis of hemorrhage, and/or a discharge diagnosis of hemorrhagic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Severe HAA is associated with increased odds for 30-day mortality and readmission after discharge; however, it is uncertain whether severe HAA is preventable.

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